Coming Of Age With Deep Roots

Settlers and immigrants in coastal BC are like driftwood tossed onto a shore where trees still stand. We came from afar to live among First Nations still connected to their roots. Some of us wonder what it’s like to be connected to the place of one’s ancestral roots and how ancient traditions nourish current generations. In this edition of Deep Roots Island Waves, Michelle Robinson tells story producer Carrie Saxifrages her experience of coming of age Coming of Age With Deep Roots by Carrie Saxifrages | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/Coming+of+Age+with+Deep+Roots+final.mp3 Michelle Robinson lives on the Klahoose First Nation Reserve in Squirrel Cove, Cortes Island. Until she was nine, she grew up in the bush on Klahoose First Nation’s traditional territory of Toba Inlet where her parents hunted, fished and prepared their children to come of age in traditional ways. Many years later, when Michelle’s daughter reached a crisis, Michelle drew upon her culture and traditions to help daughter recover. “It wasn’t just your a teenager: you are changing life now; you’re out on your own; you are a big person. It started when you were little, nurtured up and then celebrated when it happened. Then you take your place in the community where you are meant to be.” - Michelle Robinson.    ...
Thank You, E’mote For Your Support Of The Deep Roots Story Project!

Thank You, E’mote For Your Support Of The Deep Roots Story Project!

We are grateful for your encouraging donations, sponsorships and helping hands. With your support, in the last year we were able to give back to our community as well as raise awareness and do further outreach within our on-going collaboration. Here is a recap of some of our activities and events over the past year and what’s on the horizon for 2019. In November 2017 CKTZ hosted two workshops at Klahoose focusing on technical recording skills, interviewing basics and the craft of writing for radio. We had CBC audio producer/trainer Rob Selmanovic facilitate these essential trainings. Beginning in January 2018, Deep Roots hosted a series of bi weekly roundtables, where Klahoose story seeds were nurtured into themes and developed into specific interviewee/writer/story sprouts. The bridge between radio, podcast and millennia-old knowledge of oral storytelling was built with season 1. Season 2 was a refinement, with Island Waves goal that all stories originate from Klahoose community. Vintage Vignettes is a spin off of Deep Roots, and is a collaboration between CI Museum and Archives and CKTZ. In April 2018, we were featured in Salish Sea Sentinel, a magazine that serves as the voice for Naut’sa mawt Tribal Council http://salishseasentinel.ca/2018/03/deep-roots-radio-gives-platform-to-klahoose- voices/ In May 2018, our Klahoose Coordinator was honoured for her work with Deep Roots and language work, in the ReMatriate campaign, an Indigenous women’s collective https://m.facebook.com/ReMatriate/?ref=m_notif&notif_t=feedback_reaction_genericLearn more about ReMatriatehttp://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/rematriate-wants-to-take-back-visual-identity-of- first-nations-1.3029833 In June 2018, we hosted the Season 2 Launch Party, which was a wild success, with 200 in attendance to listen to stories, celebrate this community bridging project. The fundraising Bannock+Beer part of the launch party raised funds for Klahoose canoe...
Susana Vijaya Talks About Performing

Susana Vijaya Talks About Performing

Originally Published on the ECOreport She exploded onto Cortes Island’s Lip Sync stage four years ago, introducing the musical tastes of her native Portugal. She can also render a sultry imitation of Tina Turner. Her radio program Vinho do Porto is among CKTZ’s most popular. In this morning’s show, Susana Vijaya talks about performing. Susana Vijaya Starts Performing “I feel that I am …  expanding a lot. I’m becoming more public. I’m giving more not just to my close friends, the ten people who live around you, but to an audience. The first time that I sang in public was last year, at the Summer of Love. I was so nervous, I was shaking inside, my hands were shaking. And then this last winter in Mexico it was amazing, I was singing every Friday night  in the bar and every other Saturday. Suddenly I had a fan club … A lot of people would come to watch me sing and dance on stage,” she said. “That brought out a lot of insecurities because I do not think I am that good. I am still learning. In fact I still have everything to learn, but it is incredible how these processes are because I remember Lyle and I would play something and we would come feeling the worst you can imagine … That we were horrible; that we were out of tune; that we were out of rhythm. So we would go to bed feeling like the worst. Then we would wake up the next day and say ‘Lets watch the records ….’ Then we would see that in reality...
Cortes Radio’s 2018 AGM

Cortes Radio’s 2018 AGM

It was billed an an AGM like none other. Close to two hundred people attended at least one of the three events, a significant turnout on a rural island like Cortes. Some went to the thank-you party/potluck for volunteers on May 26, in Whaletown. The biggest crowd gathered in the Klahoose Multipurpose Building in Squirrel Cove, for the official launch of Deep Root’s second season. The grand finale was Cortes Radio’s 2018 AGM on June 3 at Manson’s Hall.  Cortes Radio’s 2018 AGM This was the first time a Cortes Radio AGM was preceded by other radio events. It is also the first time there was live entertainment. In Whaletown they watched a video of the recent cabaret. The first two new Deep Roots programs were aired in Squirrel Cove. Cortes Island’s own Improv troop, the Laughing Mussels, performed at the AGM. Also, CKTZ’s Secretary Rochelle Baker, who acted as the MC, sent Howie out to give everyone kisses (the chocolate kind).   The Laughing Mussels at Cortes Radio's 2018 AGM - Rochelle Baker photos Looking back over the past 13 years, Howie says “Overall I feel like this (2017/18) was our smoothest running year yet.” To which CKTZ’s Treasurer, Julia Rendall, adds, “Working with this board has been a breeze.  We communicate well and have been respectful of each others sometimes varying opinions.” The 2017/18 Board - Rochelle Baker (now Vice President), Barry Glickman (Emergency Communications) , Roy L Hales (President), Julia Rendall (Treasurer), and Leonard Woywitka (Member at Large) - was returned. In addition, Paul Fournier (now Secretary) was nominated from the floor and will join them...
Fourth Day Mopping Up The Read Island Fire

Fourth Day Mopping Up The Read Island Fire

Monday June 4, 2018 - Though BC Wildfires is continuing to monitor the site, there is no longer an immediate threat and firefighters have been withdrawn from Strathcona Provincial Park. To the east there are still 21 people working within a 8 hectare burn site in the Discovery Islands. BC Wildfire spokesperson Donna MacPherson describes the fourth day mopping up the Read Island fire. Fourth Day Mopping Up The Read Island Fire “What they are doing is that slow meticulous work that they do to mop up a fire. They are moving through the land, looking for hot spots. They are feeling with their hands. They are looking for smoke. If they find anything they dig it up, break it apart, wet it down and rebury it again.” She added, “We are finding that a fair number … [of fires] are burrowing underground because the ground itself is dry. There is not a lot of moisture down below.” “It is fairly common to spend days mopping up after a larger fire, especially one that is close to people’s homes - as is the case at Read Island. “A fire that could be smoking ground in the morning, if it gets a lot of heat on it and a bit of wind - it can pick up and start to show flame. So whether it is burning underground or burning with a flame, it is still a concern to us.” The Cost The fires on Read Island and in Strathcona Provincial Park were both caused by humans and preventable. “Of course there are dollar costs here - which can be...