Witnessing Reconcialtion In Action

Witnessing Reconcialtion In Action

This is a Cortes Radio update about witnessing reconciliation in action taken from the introduction that Carrie Saxifrage, President of the Cortes Community Forest Cooperative, gave to a meeting at Mansons Hall on May 22, 2019. “For starters, I would like to acknowledge that we are acknowledge that we are on the unceded territory of the Klahoose, the Sliammon and the Homalco and I went to the Awaken the Canoes event at Klahoose. I was really struck by the openness and generosity that I experienced, of somebody who is non indigenous. I was fed; I was taught how to paddle; how to pull a canoe. It was really amazing to me.” “It puts me in mind of the community forest and how I don’t think that we, without the Klahoose, would have a community forest. I think that they, without us, would have a community forest. The fact that it is shared is one of those acts of generosity and openness that I would like to acknowledge.” “This is reconciliation in action and this is another big word that I do not know exactly what it means but it does mean what they demonstrated to me so directly over the week-end, which is openness and generosity.” (Added by email) “I wish I’d concluded my intro by suggesting that we would do well by being as open and generous as the Klahoose as I don’t think reconciliation (openness and generosity) is really in their court, it’s our responsibility.” Photo Credits: Friends and relatives sending the Tl’emtl’ems off from the inner area at Squirrel Cove at the start of the 2018 Power Paddle to Puyallup– Roy L Hales...
To Womanhood

To Womanhood

When a girl approaches puberty, her culture’s attitudes toward women and sex come at her in new and often intense ways, both by what is said and also by what is left unsaid. Elder Helen Nora Hansen was raised in a residential school that treated coming of age with the silence of shame. Michelle Robinson’s parents raised her in the bush in Klahoose traditional territory and gave her the traditional teachings about coming of age. From their dramatically different experiences, these woman have great advice on how to support our girls as they make their way toward adulthood. To Womanhood Michelle Robinson To Womanhood by Carrie Saxifrage, Deep Roots Island Waves by Carrie Saxifrage | Deep Roots Island WavesAudio Player00:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. “It wasn’t a good experience. That was back in 1960, when I was in residential school, so not a good experience at all.” - Elder Helen Nora Hansen, Klahoose First Nation. “It was a celebrated time. Before they would have parties, which people called potlatches, coming of age ceremonies or whatever. There were things that were done to celebrate that and that young lady was kept a treasure … and taken care of.” - Michelle Robinson, Social Development Officer and Band Councillor, Klahoose First Nation. Carrie Saxifrage has lived on Cortes Island since 1994. She has worked as a nurse, lawyer and school administrator and served on numerous community boards. Most recently she wrote a climate memoir titled The Big Swim - Coming Ashore in a World Adrift. The chapter Falling into Place describes how an ancient First Nation jawbone found on her family’s land helped her...
Coming Of Age With Deep Roots

Coming Of Age With Deep Roots

Settlers and immigrants in coastal BC are like driftwood tossed onto a shore where trees still stand. We came from afar to live among First Nations still connected to their roots. Some of us wonder what it’s like to be connected to the place of one’s ancestral roots and how ancient traditions nourish current generations. In this edition of Deep Roots Island Waves, Michelle Robinson tells story producer Carrie Saxifrages her experience of coming of age Coming of Age With Deep Roots by Carrie Saxifrages | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/Coming+of+Age+with+Deep+Roots+final.mp3 Michelle Robinson lives on the Klahoose First Nation Reserve in Squirrel Cove, Cortes Island. Until she was nine, she grew up in the bush on Klahoose First Nation’s traditional territory of Toba Inlet where her parents hunted, fished and prepared their children to come of age in traditional ways. Many years later, when Michelle’s daughter reached a crisis, Michelle drew upon her culture and traditions to help daughter recover. “It wasn’t just your a teenager: you are changing life now; you’re out on your own; you are a big person. It started when you were little, nurtured up and then celebrated when it happened. Then you take your place in the community where you are meant to be.” - Michelle Robinson. Carrie Saxifrage has lived on Cortes Island since 1994. She has worked as a nurse, lawyer and school administrator and served on numerous community boards. Most recently she wrote a climate memoir titled The Big Swim - Coming Ashore in a World Adrift. The chapter Falling into Place describes how an ancient First Nation jawbone found on...