How Did Toba Inlet Get Its Name?

How Did Toba Inlet Get Its Name?

Toba is not an English word, or Coast Salish. The first Europeans to visit this remote fjord on the West Coast of British Columbia were Spanish. Deep Roots story producer Roy L Hales interviews Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse, from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian Judith Williams to ask How did Toba Inlet get its name? How Did Toba Inlet Get Its Name by Roy L Hales | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/How+Toba+Got+It%27s+Name+mp3+Master.mp3 A Spanish ship’s log entry from June 24, 1792 states: “At sunset Valdés returned. He had followed the Canal de la Tabla and inspected the vicinity. [The inlet], which appeared [of] considerable [width] at its beginning, came to an end in a few leagues; its shores were very high, with sharp peaks, its depth great, and the inlets he saw were full of small islands. On its east shore Valdés found a plank [tabla], for which he named the inlet and of which he made a drawing. It was covered with paintings, which were apparently hieroglyphics of the natives. He found some abandoned villages, but not one inhabitant.”  How Did Tobla Inlet Get Its Name? Where is this mysterious tablet with hieroglyphic writing today? What did the writing say? Why is this important to the Klahoose Nation? If the Spanish gave Tobla Inlet its name, why does their log entry say “the Canal de la Tabla” rather than Tobla Inlet? Roy L Hales is the President of the Cortes Radio Society (CKTZ 89.5 FM), where he has hosted a half hour program since 2014, and editor of the the ECOreport, a website dedicated to exploring how our lifestyle choices and technologies...

Cortes Community Forest: Five Years Of Operations

Originally Published on the ECOreport British Columbia’s old growth forests fertilize themselves as efficiently as a farmer looking after his fields. The tree plantations that are fast replacing them lack this ability. If this trend continues, the province’s vast forests may be a memory in the next two or three centuries. The inhabitants of one tiny island are trying to change this. In this morning’s program one of the directors, Bruce Ellingsen, tells me about Cortes Community Forest’s five years of operations. Cortes Community Forest After Five Years We were sitting around his kitchen table, overlooking the ocean at Smelt Bay. If you listen to the podcast above carefully, you can hear Bruce’s wife trying to be quiet in the background or the hum of the Ellingsen’s refrigerator when it came on. Our interview started with freshly brewed coffee. Cortes community forest was allotted an annual cut rate of 13,600 cubic metres (CM). In their most productive years, they only take out about 4,000 CM. Ellingsen says that so far the community forest is averaging about 16% of its quota. “We got the tenure in 2013, so we’re at the end of our first five year cut control, is the way the Ministry of Forests describes it. They came over and had a meeting with us a few months ago and did an assessment of what we are doing and found we are doing a lot less than what we were invited to apply for,” said Ellingsen. He added that the new District Manager and three other forestry officials recently came over from Campbell River “to get a sense of what’s...
The CRTC Renewed Cortes Radio’s License

The CRTC Renewed Cortes Radio’s License

Last May, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) found CKTZ to be in “apparent compliance” with our license. After months of waiting, its decision is now official. The CRTC renewed Cortes Radio’s license for another seven years. CRTC Renewed Cortes Radio’s License There is only one stipulation, “CKTZ-FM Cortes Island … shall devote no less than 40% of its musical selections from content category 2 (Popular Music) in each broadcast week to Canadian selections broadcast in their entirety.” Cortes Radio was one of eight stations whose licenses were renewed last week. Our new license takes effect on 1 September, 2018, and expires on 31 August, 2025. “This is good news. CKTZ can now move forward with its plans for the future. Among other things, we can now take the next steps towards relocating our tower to a location more suitable to fulfilling our mandate as an emergency communications resource,” said Roy L Hales, President of the Cortes radio Society. Both the  National Campus and Community Radio Association and Strathcona Regional District (SRD) supported Cortes radio’s application to have its license renewed. Emergency Communications Last August, Cortes Community Radio CKTZ signed a memorandum of understanding with the SRD stating its willingness to provide temporary usage of the station during emergencies last August. This led to the installation of a packet VHF system and associated tower at the station, connecting us to directly to the SRD. When disaster strikes, CKTZ broadcast the SRD’s emergency bulletins. The weak point in this system is CKTZ’s current reliance on the internet. Though the station has shown that it can continue to broadcast for up to 14 hours after the grid goes...

Coming Of Age With Deep Roots

Settlers and immigrants in coastal BC are like driftwood tossed onto a shore where trees still stand. We came from afar to live among First Nations still connected to their roots. Some of us wonder what it’s like to be connected to the place of one’s ancestral roots and how ancient traditions nourish current generations. In this edition of Deep Roots Island Waves, Michelle Robinson tells story producer Carrie Saxifrages her experience of coming of age Coming of Age With Deep Roots by Carrie Saxifrages | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/Coming+of+Age+with+Deep+Roots+final.mp3   Michelle Robinson lives on the Klahoose First Nation Reserve in Squirrel Cove, Cortes Island. Until she was nine, she grew up in the bush on Klahoose First Nation’s traditional territory of Toba Inlet where her parents hunted, fished and prepared their children to come of age in traditional ways. Many years later, when Michelle’s daughter reached a crisis, Michelle drew upon her culture and traditions to help daughter recover. “It wasn’t just your a teenager: you are changing life now; you’re out on your own; you are a big person. It started when you were little, nurtured up and then celebrated when it happened. Then you take your place in the community where you are meant to be.” - Michelle Robinson. Carrie Saxifrage has lived on Cortes Island since 1994. She has worked as a nurse, lawyer and school administrator and served on numerous community boards. Most recently she wrote a climate memoir titled The Big Swim - Coming Ashore in a World Adrift. The chapter Falling into Place describes how an ancient First Nation jawbone found...
Thank You, E’mote For Your Support Of The Deep Roots Story Project!

Thank You, E’mote For Your Support Of The Deep Roots Story Project!

We are grateful for your encouraging donations, sponsorships and helping hands. With your support, in the last year we were able to give back to our community as well as raise awareness and do further outreach within our on-going collaboration. Here is a recap of some of our activities and events over the past year and what’s on the horizon for 2019. In November 2017 CKTZ hosted two workshops at Klahoose focusing on technical recording skills, interviewing basics and the craft of writing for radio. We had CBC audio producer/trainer Rob Selmanovic facilitate these essential trainings. Beginning in January 2018, Deep Roots hosted a series of bi weekly roundtables, where Klahoose story seeds were nurtured into themes and developed into specific interviewee/writer/story sprouts. The bridge between radio, podcast and millennia-old knowledge of oral storytelling was built with season 1. Season 2 was a refinement, with Island Waves goal that all stories originate from Klahoose community. Vintage Vignettes is a spin off of Deep Roots, and is a collaboration between CI Museum and Archives and CKTZ. In April 2018, we were featured in Salish Sea Sentinel, a magazine that serves as the voice for Naut’sa mawt Tribal Council http://salishseasentinel.ca/2018/03/deep-roots-radio-gives-platform-to-klahoose- voices/ In May 2018, our Klahoose Coordinator was honoured for her work with Deep Roots and language work, in the ReMatriate campaign, an Indigenous women’s collective https://m.facebook.com/ReMatriate/?ref=m_notif&notif_t=feedback_reaction_genericLearn more about ReMatriatehttp://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/rematriate-wants-to-take-back-visual-identity-of- first-nations-1.3029833 In June 2018, we hosted the Season 2 Launch Party, which was a wild success, with 200 in attendance to listen to stories, celebrate this community bridging project. The fundraising Bannock+Beer part of the launch party raised funds for Klahoose canoe...