Listening in to Jody Wilson-Raybould’s “From Where I Stand”

Listening in to Jody Wilson-Raybould’s “From Where I Stand”

In a special episode of Listening In, Maria reads from former Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould‘s book From Where I Stand. Photo of Jody Wilson-Raybould by Erich Saide via Wikipedia (CC BY SA, 2.0 License) Listening In: Maria reads from former Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould‘s book “From Where I Stand” ” … In this powerful book, drawn from Wilson-Raybould’s speeches and other writings, she urges all Canadians – both Indigenous and non-Indigenous – to build upon the momentum already gained in the reconciliation process or risk hard-won progress being lost. The choice is stark: support Indigenous-led initiatives for Nation rebuilding or continue to allow governments to just “manage the problem.” She also argues that true reconciliation will never occur unless governments transcend barriers enshrined in the Indian Act that continue to deny Indigenous Peoples their rights. Until then, we’ll be stuck in the status quo – mired in conflicts and court cases that do nothing to improve people’s lives or heal the country.” “The good news is that Indigenous Nations already have the solutions. But now is the time to act and build a shared postcolonial future based on the foundations of trust, cooperation, recognition, and good governance. Frank and impassioned, this book charts a course forward – one that will not only empower Indigenous Peoples but strengthen the well-being of Canada and all Canadians.” “From Where I Stand is indispensable reading for anyone who wants to dig deeper into the reconciliation process to know what they can do to make a difference — ranging from engaged citizens, leaders, and policy-makers to students, educators, and academics, and to lawyers and consultants.” – UBC Books Willow Click...
Listening In: Authors from the Vancouver Writer’s Festival

Listening In: Authors from the Vancouver Writer’s Festival

A series of readings from Canadian authors whose works will be featured at the Vancouver Writers Festival, October 19-25, 2020. Aug 24: The Cat’s Table The Cat’s Table is a novel by Canadian author Michael Ondaatje first published in 2011. It was a shortlisted nominee for the 2011 Scotiabank Giller Prize. The novel is a coming of age story about an 11-year-old boy’s journey on a large ship’s three-week voyage from Columbia to England, via the Suez Canal and Mediterranean.  Listening IN: Francesca reads from Philip Michael Ondaatje‘ she Cat’s Table Aug 17: Wild Dogs Multi-award winning Canadian author Helen Humphries will be presenting Rabbit Foot Bill at this year’s Festival, but Francesca is reading from her fourth novel, Wild Dogs. Listening In: Francesca reads from Helen Humphries novel Wild Dogs ” … Sure to be a hit with canine lovers everywhere, launches with a bold and poetic narrative voice. It is Alice, describing the circumstances of six strangers who’ve bonded over the loss of their dogs, now roaming as a pack in the woods. She readies us for one of the novel’s extended metaphors – ‘Love is like those wild dogs.’” “This ‘club’ of abandoned pooch owners – a farfetched idea – is described beautifully by Humphreys. Their individual rituals of calling out for their dogs, the way they introduce themselves to each other (“Our name. The name of the dog. The breed. Who sent the dog away”), and the unique walks each of them used to take with their respective best friends help make these people and their predicament somehow real, and fascinating … ” – Quill and Quire Listening In Listening In is broadcast over Cortes Radio, CKTZ...
Listening In: Authors from the Vancouver Writer’s Festival

Listening In With Francesca

Soap and Water & Common Sense “The definitive guide to fighting coronaviruses, colds, flus, pandemics, and deadly diseases, from one of North America’s leading public health authorities, now updated with a new introduction on protecting yourself and others from COVID-19.“ “Dr. Bonnie Henry, a leading epidemiologist (microbe hunter) and public health doctor at the forefront of the fight against the worldwide COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak, has spent the better part of the last three decades chasing bugs all over the world — from Ebola in Uganda to polio in Pakistan, SARS in Toronto, and the H1N1 influenza outbreak across North America. Now she offers three simple rules to live by: wash your hands, cover your mouth when you cough, and stay at home when you have a fever.” – CBC Books Listening In: Guest host Maria reads from Dr Bonnie Henry’s Soap and Water & Common Sense Extra Virginity “For millennia, fresh olive oil has been one of life’s necessities-not just as food but also as medicine, a beauty aid, and a vital element of religious ritual. Today’s researchers are continuing to confirm the remarkable, life-giving properties of true extra-virgin, and “extra-virgin Italian” has become the highest standard of quality.” “But what if this symbol of purity has become deeply corrupt? Starting with an explosive article in The New Yorker, Tom Mueller has become the world’s expert on olive oil and olive oil fraud-a story of globalization, deception, and crime in the food industry from ancient times to the present, and a powerful indictment of today’s lax protections against fake and even toxic food products in the United States. A rich and...
Julie Glaspy: Stone Sculpture

Julie Glaspy: Stone Sculpture

This program was funded by a grant from the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative. “Convincing a stone to be something else is no small task; it’s heavy, it’s dusty, it’s dirty and it’s my labor of love”, says stone sculptor Julie Glaspy from Quadra Island. Chosen to represent Canada at the 2020 International symposium in Nepal, Julie talks to CKTZ about her journey in shaping stone to be something else: a granite heart two feet tall, or a small rose quatrz necklace, or her beautiful bowls. “Often, art is about finding beauty in places where it is not always commonly seen; to me art is about making something out of nothing, which is one of my main attractions to working with stone.” Cortes Currents: Francesca Gesuladi interviewing Julie Glaspy Julie Glaspy was born in Saint John, New Brunswick. Graduated from the University of New Brunswick with a Bachelor of Kinesiology in 2002. Julie has been exploring stone in its many forms and functions for over ten years. She has worked as a stonemason and has created intricate pieces of jewelry. Julie has embraced both ends of the rock carving spectrum from intricacy to monumental...
Learning To Die: As A Planet, As A Person

Learning To Die: As A Planet, As A Person

Ornithomimidae Skeleton in Central Museum of Mongolian Dinosaurs, Ulaanbaatar by Gary Todd, via Flickr (Public Domain) Originally Published on Cortes Currents “Truth-filled meditations about grace in the face of mortality.” @MargaretAtwood “Learning to Die”: In this powerful little book, two leading intellectuals illuminate the truth about where our environmental crisis is taking us. Writing from an island on Canada’s Northwest coast, Robert Bringhurst and Jan Zwicky weigh in on the death of the planet versus the death of the individual. For Zwicky, awareness and humility are the foundation of the equanimity with which Socrates faced his death: he makes a good model when facing the death of the planet, as well as facing our own mortality. Bringhurst urges readers to tune their minds to the wild. The wild has healed the world before, and it is the only thing that stands any chance of healing the world now – though it is unlikely to save Homo sapiens in the process.  Top Photo Credits: A Walk Through The Larches by Bernard Spragg via Flickr (CC BY SA, 2.0...