The Cortes Island’s Free Store

The Cortes Island’s Free Store

What is it? When Will it One? And What would it take to make the Free Store more Resilient for the Future? This program is a joint Folk U/Cortes Currents project funded by the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative.  Are you thinking and wondering about the Free Store? If you live on Cortes island, the answer is probably yes. Are you drowning in stuff, or down to two bowls in a household of four people? Every week, there are new theories as to what happened to the Free Store: where it went, what will take to get it back, and also exciting possibilities to use the Free Store model to grow Cortes Island: for keeping resources local, making better use of what the island has and reducing the amount of stuff shipped off Island. Noba Anderson, our SRD (Strathcona Regional District) elected representative joins us to discuss the history of the Free Store, its organizational (or non organizational structure), and what it would take if Cortes residents wanted to grow the Free Store or expand its operations in the future. Lori-Anne then joins to discuss what the Free Store reopening plan looks like in practice. The Cortes Island Free Store story In short, the Cortes Island Free Store story goes like this: the Free Store has become a beloved island resource that is far more than a Share Shed or a junk heap but is our ReUse Centre, Thrift Store, and Boutique all in one. However, the Free Store is an anomaly that is allowed by the SRD but isn’t licensed, regulated, or overseen by any actual organization. Therefore, nothing...
The Art of Leadership

The Art of Leadership

Folk U Radio: Art of Community Leadership 101.  In this episode Colin Funk joins to discuss with host Manda Aufochs Gillespie to look at the idea of community leadership a little deeper. What is the mix of magic and resourcefulness and entrepreneurialism that makes an effective community leader? How do we cultivate that resilient and spontaneous aspects of our selves? And how do we create organizations that will support us in being responsive and visionary to the needs of a community? Even harder, how do we pivot organizations and businesses and ourselves when it is time for things to change or to let old-ways go?  Jenny Evans from North Island Employment Foundation also joins to discuss a bit more about how individuals can pivot in their work lives. Folk U Friday: Manda Aufochs Gillespie interviews Colin Funk about the Art of Leadership Colin Funk works as an organizational consultant and leadership development coach and was a trustee with the Cortes Island Business and Tourism Association and is now a director of Cortes Community Economic Development Association or as an improv actor and leader of the Laughing Mussels Improv Troop. What is Community Leadership? Manda: How do you define community leadership? What might it look like in a small community like ours? Colin: Community describes people who share a particular place and all the resources located there. A healthy community is a place where all people can meet their economic, social, physical, cultural, and spiritual needs, work together for the common good; and participate in creating their futureCommunity Leader…..a person who works with others to develop and sustain the health of the community Community Leadership occurs when anyone, regardless...
Folk U’s Firewood for dummies

Folk U’s Firewood for dummies

Worried about staying warm this winter? What will it take for Cortes to have sustainable fire wood for all? Corry Dow discussed all things firewood, the Cortes Community Community Firewood Program and how you can take part in staying warm on CKTZ’s Folk U Radio. Corry Dow - submitted photo Folk U: Manda Aufochs Gillespie interviews Corry Dow about firewood for dummies Here are Corrie’s notes Recently participated in the 3rd Community Forest Community Firewood Day What is it?Why do we do it?What comes up? I need wood for this winterI only want Fir It’s a small amount of wood Learning the cycle of firewood Timing Seasoning i.e. harvested and kept for some seasons before it’s ready to burn, wind, sunshine and time6mos – 2yrsDepends of density of wood and sap content and storage 2. Storage Splitting – to speed drying and for ease of handling and burningOff the ground to prevent rotCovered to keep off rainIn a spot that gets sunNot too tightly stacked and open at sides to maximize airflowEnough storage space to hold a whole winter’s worth of wood. As space opens up later in the winter, start putting in next year’s wood 3. Rotation If you don’t get firewood all at onceBurn older wood first, especially if it’s spent time on the ground, and driestChoose dry pieces 4. Plan for the next year Getting wood in the late winter/early spring is ideal, low sap, long drying timeExtra storage options for wood that comes along providentially 5. I only want Fir –  some thoughts on firewood species Alder 19.5Hemlock 24.4Douglas Fir 26.5 million BTUs per dry cord Douglas fir is great, but not all...
Board Reality 101

Board Reality 101

Today’s Folk U Radio is called Board Reality 101. And by board I am referring to a piece of wood. What is a tree? What are our forests to us? On today’s Folk University we look deeper into this question and the incredible partnership between the Klahoose First Nations and non-nation members in creating a forest managed by a community.  Folk U Radio: Manda Aufochs Gillespie interviews Mark Lombard& Nick Gagnon from the Cortes Fortes General Partnership Cortes Forest General Partnership: A Unique Model for Community Forest Stewardship Mark Lombard, ecological builder and manager with the Cortes Forest General Partnership, joins us to open this episode to explain the Partnership, the Cortes Community Forest Coop, and the impressive and rare community stewardship being modelled on Cortes. The Cortes Forest General Partnership holds a 3,800 ha Crown land tenure and was won thanks to visionary work of those that came before including the Klahoose First Nations and their generosity. The Partnership includes three members of the Klahoose Nation and three non-indigenous members, which are selected by the Cortes Community Forest Coop. The primary function of the Coop is to represent the non-indigenous community and select these three members of the Partnership. The Co-op has no other operational decision-making regarding the community forest. Creating Lifestyle Businesses from Protecting Forest Ecosystems Nick Gagnon is from a family business of silviculturists. Silviculture is the “art and science” of cultivating forest health for the trees, and the wildlife, water, soil, and for the land stewards/users. His family supported themselves actively managing forests for their health and using the dead or lower quality trees to create fibre resources. This was heavily dependent on...
Archaeology 102: Peoples of BC

Archaeology 102: Peoples of BC

In Archaeology 102: The Science of Once and Future Things BC edition professor and neighbour Dr. Brian Hayden, archaeologist, takes us through thousands of years of human history and what it can tell us about the peoples of BC.  Quiggly hole, or Si7xten, in Lillooet, 1996 by Skookum1 @ en.wikipedia (Public domain) Folk U Radio: Manda Aufochs Gillespie interviews Dr Brian Hayden about Archaeology 102 Archaeology, like all sciences, has those aspects of it which are certain, probable, and speculative Dr. Hayden tells us. Because archeology as a science has only been around for 150 years there are not a lot of certain things, such as that the first stone tools showed up 2 to 3 million years ago, that the first people came to North America 15 to 20,0000 years ago, and that both cultural and biological evolution of humans has occurred.  First people in BC These things are known. Recent findings in BC, such as the 14,000 year old artifacts at Triquet Island, now compose the oldest artifacts found in North America. The artifacts were found just 500 km northwest of Victoria and included tools for lighting fires, fish hooks, and spears. They seem to confirm what many archeologists have speculated: that humans first came into North America along the coast of BC 20,000 to 15,000 years ago. Geologically at this time, the ice-sheets were parting. These ice-sheets covered the area and were covered by 1 kilometre-deep ice. This ice melted about 10,000 years ago in this area. It is probable that these first peoples were simple hunter gatherers that lived with no competition, where little or nothing was owned,...