Folk U goes to the AirWaves!

Folk U goes to the AirWaves!

We can still be connected, inspired, and supported as a community. And without a computer! Folk University is coming to the Cortes Community Radio CKTZ 89.5… Same time (1 to 3p.m.) every Friday through the Spring, starting Friday, March 27. We will still have neighbours sharing their interests and skills AND there will be a call-in option at (250) 935-0200 for YOU to ask your questions and share your knowledge. Look for topic details forthcoming. (And if you can discuss wild harvesting, gardening, etc.. I’m particularly interested in you!) These airwaves are virus free…. turn the radio on, get your phone handy, extra points if you take it outside and share it with your community (at a 2 meter distance of course). Folk University: going...
Cortes Health Centre Staff Speaks Out About COVID-19

Cortes Health Centre Staff Speaks Out About COVID-19

Flattening the Curve, The Benefits and Risks of Self Isolation; & How we can care for each other during this pandemic. Cortes Health Centre Staff, Tahmeena Ali, MD—visiting doctor—and Isabelle Laplante, RN—new staff nurse— speak out about all anyone is talking about, COVID-19, and what it means for the people of Cortes Island.  Manda Aufochs Gillespie photo Cortes Currents: Manda Aufochs Gillespie interviews Tahmeena Ali, MD and Isabelle Laplante, RN about COVID 19 Coronavirus & The COVID 19 Pandemic The coronavirus has been floating around for a long time and many of us have already have had a form of the coronavirus as it’s what often causes the common cold, explains Dr. Ali. COVID-19 is a subtype of the coronavirus that is extremely infectious and for particular populations—the elderly or those with other medical issues—can cause serious illness and has even resulted in deaths. The mortality rate of those who have gotten it is much higher than for the common cold, especially for the elderly.  Viruses are more able to change or mutate very quickly on their own which is why it’s harder to treat viruses than bacteria, which can usually be treated with antibiotics. There is some research that there may be some antivirals that might help treat it, but as that is down the road, the emphasis has been on prevention, explains Dr. Ali.   Flattening The Curve  Flattening the curve refers to the idea of limiting exposure so that the healthcare system is able to manage the number of new serious cases of COVID-19 thereby stretching out the time period over which people get sick. It’s thought...
Two Upcoming Housing Initiatives

Two Upcoming Housing Initiatives

A Visioning Workshop - Courtesy Cortes Community Housing website “It takes a community to raise a village,” it says on the Cortes Community Housing website (at cortescommunityhousing.org).  This has clearly been the case on Cortes Island with two upcoming housing initiatives undertaken by the Housing Committee of the Cortes Island Seniors Society.  Cortes Currents: Manda Aufochs Gillespie interviews Sandra Wood Expansion Of The Seniors Village The first building project, the expansion of the Seniors Village, will expand the existing seniors village to include ten cottages from just six, occupied with a long waiting list since 2009. These are exclusively for people over the age of 55. If all goes well, construction will begin by June of 2020 and occupied before Christmas.  Rainbow Ridge Cortes Community Housing Development - map taken from recent rezoning application - see associated article. The second, and more ambitious, building project is known as Rainbow Ridge and that is the 51 acres right next door to the Seniors Village, south of the Firehall that runs along Cemetery Rd.  This project will start by housing 20 families that can include singles, elders, or people with children. The last couple of years has including a major fundraising effort to buy this land in order to even start the process of planning and funding a housing project. The first phase of building on Rainbow Ridge only uses six acres, the rest of the 45 is being held for community green ways and parks and to fulfill future housing needs, which Sandra Wood, Housing Coordinator for the Cortes Housing Committee, says could take any number of forms, such as long-term affordable home ownership,...
Review: These Are My Words

Review: These Are My Words

As an immigrant to Canada, I was shocked to learn about the Canadian legacy of residential schools. I had no idea growing up in the U.S. that such things were happened and had happened just north of the border. The indigenous residential schools operated in Canada starting in the 1870s with the last one not closing until1996. Children as young as four were taken—often against the will of their families or with coercive techniques such as threatening jail time—and it is estimated that over 150,000 Indian, Inuit, and Métis children attended residential school. I was reminded that it is a  legacy that continues to shade aspects of Canadian culture and identity for all Canadians this year when I became a citizen. At the ceremony, the judge encouraged all of us new Canadians to make the act of reconciliation personal and spoke about how she was doing that in her life.  Can We Understand? How does one take on such an enormous task of try to make better—or even understand—a system like residential school? It feels like an enormous task but one as an immigrant and as a mother that I want to take seriously. “Too many Canadians know little or nothing about the deep historical roots of these conflicts. This lack of knowledge has serious consequences for First Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples and for Canada,” counsels the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in their Final Report.  History is important because it allows us as a people to look at the dark aspects of our history to make our way toward a lighter future. But where to begin? One of the ways...
Interviewing Sue Hall

Interviewing Sue Hall

originally published on Cortes Currents This week’s guest at Folk University’s Folk U Friday series was Sue Hall author of Fish Don’t Climb Trees, head of the Whole Dyslexic Society, and Davis Dyslexia facilitator. Sue Hall is also dyslexic and the mother of a dyslexic child and has taught a positive-based approached to working with dyslexia for 20 years. She talked about how to fid the gift in so-called learning disabilities and work with dyslexia in a positive way. Please listen to the CKTZ podcast for a brief interview with Sue Hall or visit https://thegreenmama.com/learning-differences/ to read more about dyslexia and learning differences.  What is a Learning Difference? One of the technical prerequisites of a learning disorder diagnosis is the possession of at least an average (and often above average) IQ, along with difficulties in processing spoken or written language or symbols. Thus, by definition, someone with a diagnosed learning disorder is “smart,” yet they may struggle with reading or writing or doing basic math. This is very different from an intellectual disability, signifying a cognitive capacity that is below average.  There can be learning differences that occur for a variety of reasons, though not all are considered learning disorders. Learning differences we typically hear about include dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). While all of these can affect a person’s learning, the medical and educational communities do not consider ADHD and ASD learning disorders.  So what is considered a learning disorder? Dyslexia, dysgraphia, and dyscalculia are common examples of learning disorders according to the medical and educational communities:  Dyslexia is the broadest of these “dys-es”, and affects the way a person relates...