Review: These Are My Words

Review: These Are My Words

As an immigrant to Canada, I was shocked to learn about the Canadian legacy of residential schools. I had no idea growing up in the U.S. that such things were happened and had happened just north of the border. The indigenous residential schools operated in Canada starting in the 1870s with the last one not closing until1996. Children as young as four were taken—often against the will of their families or with coercive techniques such as threatening jail time—and it is estimated that over 150,000 Indian, Inuit, and Métis children attended residential school. I was reminded that it is a  legacy that continues to shade aspects of Canadian culture and identity for all Canadians this year when I became a citizen. At the ceremony, the judge encouraged all of us new Canadians to make the act of reconciliation personal and spoke about how she was doing that in her life.  Can We Understand? How does one take on such an enormous task of try to make better—or even understand—a system like residential school? It feels like an enormous task but one as an immigrant and as a mother that I want to take seriously. “Too many Canadians know little or nothing about the deep historical roots of these conflicts. This lack of knowledge has serious consequences for First Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples and for Canada,” counsels the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in their Final Report.  History is important because it allows us as a people to look at the dark aspects of our history to make our way toward a lighter future. But where to begin? One of the ways...
Interviewing Sue Hall

Interviewing Sue Hall

originally published on Cortes Currents This week’s guest at Folk University’s Folk U Friday series was Sue Hall author of Fish Don’t Climb Trees, head of the Whole Dyslexic Society, and Davis Dyslexia facilitator. Sue Hall is also dyslexic and the mother of a dyslexic child and has taught a positive-based approached to working with dyslexia for 20 years. She talked about how to fid the gift in so-called learning disabilities and work with dyslexia in a positive way. Please listen to the CKTZ podcast for a brief interview with Sue Hall or visit https://thegreenmama.com/learning-differences/ to read more about dyslexia and learning differences.  What is a Learning Difference? One of the technical prerequisites of a learning disorder diagnosis is the possession of at least an average (and often above average) IQ, along with difficulties in processing spoken or written language or symbols. Thus, by definition, someone with a diagnosed learning disorder is “smart,” yet they may struggle with reading or writing or doing basic math. This is very different from an intellectual disability, signifying a cognitive capacity that is below average.  There can be learning differences that occur for a variety of reasons, though not all are considered learning disorders. Learning differences we typically hear about include dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). While all of these can affect a person’s learning, the medical and educational communities do not consider ADHD and ASD learning disorders.  So what is considered a learning disorder? Dyslexia, dysgraphia, and dyscalculia are common examples of learning disorders according to the medical and educational communities:  Dyslexia is the broadest of these “dys-es”, and affects the way a person relates...
Cultivating Traditional Health

Cultivating Traditional Health

Recent research and long held traditions around health and food have challenged conventional practices of making available and promoting high carbohydrate, sugary, processed foods for convenience and economy. Some studies now conclude that animal fats have more to do with maintaining good health than eating the previously recommended low fat diet. Traditional Indigenous diets clearly show how eating from one’s own environment suits our overall well being and health. The experiences of our ancestors also has been shown to inform our own genetics, affecting our present day to day life. In this episode of Deep Roots Island Waves, Producer Manda Aufochs Gillespie links place, food, genetic history and health for insight into possibilities for understanding how we’re much more than we eat.” Culturing Traditional Health by Manda Aufochs Gillespie | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/specialproduction/14+Cultivating+Traditional+Health+mp3+master.mp3 Traditional Health & Epigenetics “This story of salmon boy is a fantastical creation myth and it is a story of how essential animals were to one indigenous community. Or how the health of a people in intricately connected to the health of their food source. This connection is behind one of today’s newest science buzzwords, epigenetics. “Epigenectics is the study of how the expression of our genes can be turned up or down by environmental factors. We are learning that things we once considered hardwired, such as our tendency towards obesity, heart disease and even schizophrenia can be influenced by our grandparent’s diets or something like our great grandparent’s exposure to certain chemicals, or even experiences such as something that may have happened to our ancestors like one winter spent very hungry or extremely...
Preserve/ Preserve/ Reserve

Preserve/ Preserve/ Reserve

  “It’s a mouth-watering touring through time in this piece as I explore how the preservation of food and culture are connected on and off the Reserve. Pull up a chair, all are welcome at the table as we learn about smoking salmon, stringing herring, and why all important events start with sharing a meal.” - Manda Aufochs Gillespie   Preserve/Preserve/Reserve by Manda Aufochs Gillespie | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/06+Preserve+Preserve+Reserve+mp3+Master.mp3 It’s that time of year at Kookpa’s house!
Today’s phrase of the day is 
ɬaɬganačɛnsəm ta ɬagət hoy šɛmatč.
tlatl’gah’na’chensum ta tla’gut hoy sheh’mat’ch
I will thread the herring and then dry it. The elder in this recording is Dave Dominick Please click on this link to listen https://fv.nuxeocloud.com/…/No…/Sliammon/learn/phrases/50885 - ~from Koosen Pielle, language preservationist. I’d like to thank Yvonne Louie, Koosen Pielle, Tiffany Jamieson, Sally Fallon Morrell, Morgan Tams, Odette Auger, and Jacqueline Mathieu for help creating this story through the gifts of their time, stories, passion, and clam chowder.  Manda Aufochs-Gillespie is a health writer, author of the Green Mama series of books (Dundurn), and publisher of the award-winning website thegreenmama.com, Manda LOVES writing about, talking about and, of course, eating food! It’s been a dream getting to write for radio, meet and interview some of my heroes, and explore deeper my Cortes home while putting together this piece for Cortes radio. Thanks to each and everyone who took the time to share a bit of their story in shaping this story....