COVID impacts on Cortes Island’s afterschool programming

COVID impacts on Cortes Island’s afterschool programming

During the last week of November, a health officer stopped Teen Szene as it was a hang out, not a sports program. We spoke about the need these programs fill, and Jodi’s thoughts on the process of adapting to COVID 19 reality.  Photo credit: Smelt Bay on Cortes Island via Flickr (CC BY SA, 2.0 License) Cortes Currents: Odette Auger interviews Jodi Peters about the impact COVId has had on Teen Tzene Jodi Peters: I’m the youth programs manager for the Cortes community health association and the Cortes Community Health Association, or the CCHA runs the community health center on Cortes, which staffs doctors. And it also runs youth programming and family and just general community wellbeing programming as well. So I manage the youth programs and right now we have four of them, from ages started at age of seven, all the way up to teenagers and then in age 17. And, we offer those programs in two to three year chunks so that we can offer developmentally appropriate programming for younger kids and, preteens and teenagers. And then we also have a sports and after-school sports program.  Odette: What happened in March, when COVID-19 entering our lives? Could you walk us through these different stages in afterschool programming, and what that looks like from your end.  Jodi: Well, for, for myself, for our programs, when schools shut down, we pretty much immediately had to shut down. Three of the, four of our programs were dependent on access to the school and, and with all of the efforts being made by the community and public health to, you know, to get everybody...
Safe return to play: Novice hockey during COVID-19

Safe return to play: Novice hockey during COVID-19

How novice hockey is happening in Campbell River, Vancouver Island.  The following article is an excerpt from a program that was originally aired on Cortes Radio. This program was funded by a grant from the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative.  In the parking lot at Strathcona Gardens Recreation Complex, COVID-1919 Ambassadors take in screening checklists, supervise hand sanitizing, as the novice hockey kids arrive at the arena. During COVID-19, the dressing room is either the parking lot or the forest. Seen here and above: Harvest Elliott, Novice CRMHA. Photo Credit: Odette Auger Cortes Currents: Odette Auger profiles novice hockey and the ambassador program during COVID 19 COVID 19 Ambassadors The ambassadors are basically replacing the parents- without dressing rooms, the kids show up in all their gear, walking through the parking lot with skate guards. They ensure kids hand sanitize before putting on their gloves, and the masked ambassadors take the guards off and space them out 6 feet apart along the hallway in the arena.  Campbell River Minor Hockey Association (CRMHA) sends out regular emails outlining COVID-1919 protocols, updates to how this translates to the arena. Assessing how measures were working, making adjustments to trouble shoot. Jeanine Sumner and Jodi Check Broer are two of the COVID 19 ambassadors trained to support the novice age group. They share their thoughts and explain how things are different this year.  “Upon the kids returning to play,” says Sumner,  “Parent volunteers, such as ourselves, also known as COVID-19 ambassadors were identified and trained and that included new entry and exit points, no use of the change rooms. The kids were not...
Tla-amin weaving continues despite COVID

Tla-amin weaving continues despite COVID

Sosan Blaney is an Indigenous woman, artist, mom, wife. She’s also a very talented Tla’amin weaver. Sosan came to Klahoose to teach weaving workshops before COVID-19 interrupted. In this story we’ll catch up with Sosan and what she’s been doing during COVID-19.  L-R: Gail Blaney, Elsie Paul. Photo Credit: Sosan Blaney.  Cortes Currents: Odette Auger interviews Sosan Blaney about Tla’amin weaving ‘Cultural Resource Library Coordinator at Tla’amin Child Development Resource Centre’ Odette: - Hi, Sosan. You’re a talented artist and weaver. Can you tell me about your work life also though? Tell me about your work in the schools. Sosan Blaney: - So my official job…is cultural resource library coordinator at the Tla’amin Child Development Resource Center. Sounds pretty fancy. I just run the cultural programming through the daycare. And I do a lot of outreach with the schools. I was mandated to work with ages zero to six. So it was a lot of early childhood education for the past… Oh, I guess seven or eight years now. But it’s recently changed to a more broader age group, which was nice because then I can branch out to older groups. And so I do that part time. And then I do a lot of work with the school district and different programming. We have some wonderful programming, School District 47 at the Outdoor Learning Center that we have here. So the weaving and wild crafting program that I’ve been doing for… I don’t even know how many years now, where kids come in and they learn about some wild crafting at the Outdoor Learning Center. We do some rope and learn about plant dyes and plant medicines...
Summer Job during the pandemic

Summer Job during the pandemic

The following radio broadcast was funded by a grant from the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative.  Natalia Nybida is a Vancouver Island university student, going into her second year. This is her summer job experience during the pandemic. . . After the loggers left - submitted photo Cortes Currents: Odete Auger interviews Natalia Auger Nybida about her summer job during the pandemic Home on Cortes Q: You grew up on Cortes, describe your Island home  Natalia:…my home is kind of in the direct center of the Island. So it’s surrounded by trees and it’s nice and quiet, but if you want to go to any of  the stores or anything, it’s like a 20 minute car ride or walking for three hours. So it’s definitely different from the kind of life that most people live nowadays.  Q: Last summer, you came home from school boarding out and had a summer job. Tell me why that’s important for university students.  Natalia: I was living in Ucluelet for high school for the last two years, actually. And it was actually quite a lot like where I grew up because it was quiet. It was a really small town. There’s probably a thousand people… So it was, it was like a sleepy last year. And,  I finished a couple months earlier than I expected. So I came back to Cortes and there wasn’t work right away because it’s pretty seasonal over here. So I was just hanging out with my family for a month. And then I started working at a kitchen, at Hollyhock, which is a...
Touch The Earth

Touch The Earth

This program was funded by a grant from the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative.  A local youth attended an IndigenEYEZ training series: the goals are 5 fold: to strengthen the way that we walk in the world through the five modules – connecting to myself, to others, to community, to our cultural strengths, and to the land. I work for IndigenEYEZ, and attended Touch The Earth facilitator training… excitingly, my daughter Sofia was invited by the director as a youth trainee.  We travelled to the Okanagan, this session of the training was held at Headwaters Lake Camp. When I arrived at the camp, I visited with director Kelly Terbasket- in a cozy cabin on Headwaters Lake.  Cortes Currents: Odette describes an IndigenEYEZ training series: Touch the Earth Wáy [hello]  Kelly Terbasket. HI everyone, I’m Kelly Terbasket. I’m the director of IndigenEYEZ, I’m one of the co-founders, and I’m also one of the lead facilitators. IndigenEYEZ is about renewing relationships. Renewing our relationships with each other, and with the land. Snqsilxw means ‘sharing one skin’. We share a membrane with each other, including all our relations. And our mission is to strengthen those- our connection and our relationships. With the land, with the water, in order to become stronger stewards of the land. And remember our responsibilities to the whole. IndigenEYEZ is medicine for relationships. And that includes our relationship with the land, and with our water. That we remember, and revitalize our traditional teachings and values and principals… that remind us that we do ‘share one skin’ with all our relations. Snqsilxw means we...