Greg Osoba On Music & Radio

Greg Osoba On Music & Radio

Originally Published on the ECOreport (Now Cortes Currents) He helped shape Cortes Radio almost since the beginning. as one of the station’s early Presidents, as a senior producer of our Deep Roots Initiative and most Fridays he hosts the Lunchtime Locomotion. In addition to this, he is a member of Cortes Island’s original rock quartet and more recently Back Eddy and the Procrastinators. In this morning’s interview, I asked Greg Osaba to tell us his story. In the podcast, Greg Osaba talks about … The radio station at Seneca College, in Ontario His eight years as a broadcast journalist in Toronto, Edmonton & Vancouver: in the newsroom and as host of “Bookshelf” Interviewing Guy Dauncey; Premier Peter Lougheed; Joe Clark; Wayne Gretsky … Asking tough questions of politicians vs interviewing a grieving family Ska, the precursor of Reggae How prerecording takes the soul out of music Gordy & Zoe Ryan from Babatunde Olatunji’s Drums of Passion; Island Rythm; Six Foot Johnson; Back Eddy and the Procrastinators When Gregor Robertson lived on Cortes Island, his first campaign (as an NDP MLA) The art of creating space, in music and life Falling in love with Cortes Island Linnaea Farm, Hollyhock, Rex Weyler as a mentor in writing, Getting involved with Cortes Radio, The Friday Lunchtime Locomotion with Nat king Cono   “There is something to that adage 10 years or 10,000 hours, because something starts to happen after that point. Once you put in your time, what starts to happen I’ve found - and other musicians I know who are experienced concur with this - is that you become competent  …....
Solution For Colony Collapse Disorder

Solution For Colony Collapse Disorder

Originally Published on Cortes Currents.ca There was an upside to this summer’s long ferry waits at the Whaletown terminal on Cortes island. One of North America’s leading fungi experts, Paul Stamets, was in the car in front of me.  While we were waiting for a second ferry, he told me about his discovery a solution for colony collapse disorder.  Wild Bees Are Infected “I’ve been working with the USDA, the United States Department of Agriculture, and Washington State University. Dr Jay Evans, of the USDA, told me has not seen a virus free bee in ten years. Wild bees are infected with viruses, but not ALL wild bees with Deformed Wing Virus. The concern is that they will soon will be from domesticated honey bees. Why? Well, when the honey bees visit a flower they leave viral particles on the flower and so when wild bees come to the same flower they pick up the viral particle. So now this virus has spread all over, even yellow jackets have been found to carry the deformed wing virus.” “ … We are facing a tremendous threat to our world-wide food security … It’s getting worse. This is the proverbial canary in the coal mine. The loss of honey bees is one factor for commercial implications, but most people don’t realize that wild bees, bumble bees and other wild bees, give farmers approximately 80% of their benefits. [This] pollination comes from wild bees, not honey bees … The loss of wild bees is even more dramatic, but much harder to calculate.” The Leading Cause of Colony Collapse “ … When colony collapse...
Cortes Island's Future

Cortes Island's Future

The post that follows is contains personal opinions not necessarily endorsed by the Cortes Radio Society, Board, staff, volunteers or membership. Originally Published on Cortes Currents By the time you hear this, everyone on Cortes Island will have received a newsletter from their Regional Director (or read it on the Tideline). I found it left me with more questions than answers. So I asked Noba Anderson to explain her vision for Cortes Island’s political future. A Cortes Community Council “I want to built community council, really simply put. City has a mayor and council. There is a group of people that are elected by the community to discuss matters of interest to the community and make decisions that pertain to the community and communicate the city’s will to outside agencies. First Nations, equally, have a chief and council. There’s a formalized, recognized, legitimate structure that is more than sending one person two ferry rides away to sit with twelve other reps,” says Director Anderson. The way the SRD functions: “I am inherently a minority and structurally, we don’t know things about each other, we don’t know each other’s communities – even with the best intentions, which aren’t necessarily always there.” “So I’m interested in building something here that is complementary to the Regional District structure and certainly in no way would supersede or replace it. Over time as, I believe, our systems will inevitably fray with the pressures of climate change, we will have this system to really rely on here.” “This is the inside of the Hornby Island Co-op, the largest store on the island.” – by Daryl Mitchell via Flickr...
The Strathcona Regional District Board Is Collectively Responsible

The Strathcona Regional District Board Is Collectively Responsible

Originally Published on Cortes Currents The opinions expressed in the following post are not necessarily shared by the Cortes Radio Society, its’ board, staff, volunteers or membership. A quick perusal of the Agenda was sufficient. I knew I had to attend the next meeting. Chair Michele Babchuk was bringing a Cortes Island resident’s complaints before the SRD Board. On Thursday December 4, more than a half dozen Cortesians filed into the new SRD Boardroom to listen. Though seemingly humbled, Babchuk pointed to the SRD’s accomplishments and stated that Sue Ellingsen was wrong to single out Directors Jim Abram and Brenda Leigh for criticism: the SRD Board is collectively responsible.  Chair Babchuk’s Report “I want to thank Ms Ellingsen for writing. I think it’s important that our constituents hold us accountable and give us the ability to give us their clear perspective. It’s never easy to read some of the stuff that’s in there around constituents feeling we act in an unprofessional or ineffective manner, especially when issues from that area have consumed our agenda for the last year. I actually think that, although there has been some historic issues, we’ve actually been able to cover off quite a few in the last year – with the fire service and of course the hall tax. I want to add that, from the Board’s perspective, a lot of the issues in this letter are now done …“ says Chair Babchuk, in the podcast above.  She adds, “ … The only piece that I would really like to take a little pause with is that, as a board, we work by via resolution – whether that is in camera or out of camera. All of the resolutions...
Cortes Island's Cat Rescue

Cortes Island's Cat Rescue

Originally Published on Cortes Currents According to the definition at neighborhoodcats.org, “A “feral” cat is unsocialized and tends to be fearful of people and keep a distance.” This may once have been true of the sixteen cats Samantha Statton is currently looking after but, speaking as a former cat owner, a few of these are among the friendliest cats I have seen. It was hard to take a picture because they were constantly sniffing my lens, or trying to smooch, and one adorable youngster liked to jump up onto my shoulder for a nuzzle. In this morning’s interview Samantha explains how Cortes Cat Rescue came into being, what they do and ways you can help out.  Cats Kill Birds “Some people don’t like cats; they kill birds. Well, yes they do and that’s one thing I do not like about cats, but that’s one of the things they do. You can keep your cat in the house. Some cats, right from day one, are happy to live indoors. In the same breath, if there is an overabundance of cats, there is just that many more to kill more birds,” she said.  “They’re out there struggling and trying to catch some food … They’ll get predated [by] eagles, hawks, wolves, cougars and racoons even … They will perish, but still they have this tough hard life and in my view it is just not a good scene.”  Samantha was referring to Cortes Island’s feral cats, which were originally pets. She has a suggestion: “If you get your cat spaded and neutered, you’d cut down that problem as well. Its a win-win situation I think: for the cats, for...