Homelessness In Our Area

Homelessness In Our Area

This program was funded by a grant from the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative.  Summer is here, and with it  an increase in the number of homeless people in our communities. According to Sue Moen, the Salvation Army’s representative in the Campbell River and District Coalition to End Homelessness, this problem goes back about forty years - to when the federal government stopped subsidizing affordable housing. In the wake of the COVID pandemic, many Canadians have come to the realization that issues like this are community problems and we all need to seek solutions. In this morning’s interview, we talk about homelessness in our area. Cortes Currents: Sue Moen, from the Campbell River & District Coalition to End Homelessness, talks about homelessness in our area. BC Housing’s Definition of Homelessness “Homeless, according to the definition used by BC Housing, includes people who are precariously housed, or couch surfing, or aren’t paying rent directly to a landlord. They may be sharing a room, but their name isn’t on the rental agreement. They don’t know if they’ll have housing for the next thirty days … Also, there are a lot of people who are living in vehicles, RVs, and some even in campsites,” said Moen. “If they are off the beaten track and do not connect with services, they sometimes do even consider themselves homeless.”   Describe A Typical Homeless Person “Describe a typical homeless person?” I asked.  “There isn’t typical. People become homeless for every reason that there is a person experiencing homelessness. It could be fleeing violence, family break-down, fire, flood or an expected...
Cortes Island ZOOM Conferences

Cortes Island ZOOM Conferences

On March 24, 2020, Regional Director Noba Anderson started a series of Cortes Island ZOOM conferences that have continued down to the present. The first three sessions were with key businesses and non- profits, but on April 1 Director Anderson opened these meetings up to anyone on Cortes Island.   Tuesday June 9 Zoom Conference At the June 9th Cortes virtual Community meeting, Regional Director Noba Anderson and four guests talked about all things fire: Jessica Duncan, Wildfire Prevention Officer with the BC Wildfire Service, Jeffrey Belcher, from the Sunshine Coast Fire Zone (which includes Cortes Island),CarrieSaxifrage President of the Cortes Community Forest CooperativeShaun Koopman, who is celebrating his four year anniversary as the SRD’s Protective Services Coordinator Tuesday May 26 ZOOM Conference Regional Director Noba Anderson interviews Adam McKenty and Loni Taylor from the Cortes Community Economic Development Association. May 19 Zoom Conference In the May 19, 2020, ZOOM conference Desta Beattie of Cortes Island Family Support and Manda Aufochs Gillespie of Folk U explained what they do and what their Grant in Aid applications were for. Written Report of this meeting: https://cortescurrents.ca/may-19-virtual-community-meeting-family-support-folk-u/ May 12 Zoom Conference Written report of this Meeting - coming to the Cortes Currents website soon. Subjects Covered in the podcast above: Rex Weyler talks about Overshoot and gives a list of influential books.Max Thaysen, President of FOCI, talks about FOCI and the five components of their new proposal: Decolonization, conservation, stewardship, wild food, and eco-youth. Written Report of this meeting - https://cortescurrents.ca/may-12th-cortes-virtual-meeting-focis-larger-picture-vision/ May 6 Zoom Conference Written report of this meeting - https://cortescurrents.ca/developing-cortes-island-food-security/ Subjects Covered: No known cases of COVID on CortesCortes Island non-profits...
Black Lives Matter Rally in Campbell River

Black Lives Matter Rally in Campbell River

George Floyd’s needless death, at the hands of white Minneapolis police officers, sparked protests throughout North America. They have been held in most Canadian cities and many towns. A Black Lives Matter rally will be held in Campbell River’s Spirit Square at 11 AM on Saturday, June 6th, 2020. One of the event organizers, Taylor Ellis, told the Campbell River Mirror, “Racism is a problem in both Canada and in the U.S., and in Canada we’re just kind of brushing it under the rug. It’s easier to just look at the States and what’s going on down there and say that ‘Canada’s not that bad.’ I feel like we need to shed light on how it’s also happening here. We can’t ignore it and say it’s not that bad here. It is and we need to bring justice to the people who have been murdered for the colour of their skin.” More Likely To Be Jailed I have had a couple of African friends over the years, but am basically so removed from this issue that I would really prefer to hear from someone with more insight. Never-the-less, there are some facts that are hard to ignore. According to the John Howard Society:  “An analysis of 10,000 arrests in Toronto showed that Blacks were 50% more likely to be taken to a police station for processing after arrest, and 100% more likely to be held overnight than were whites, even taking into account criminal history and age.  When given bail, they had more conditions imposed.”  “The extent to which blacks and Aboriginals are over represented in Canadian correctional institutions is similar to that...
Cortes Species At Risk

Cortes Species At Risk

Northern Goshawk - Courtesy FOCI This radio broadcast was funded by a grant from the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative.  Helen Hall has been the Friends of Cortes Island’s (FOCI) Executive Director for close to five years. Autumn Barret Morgan came to FOCI as a summer student and continues on as the volunteer Conservation Assistant. In this morning’s program they talk about Cortes species at risk.  Not As Developed As Other Areas “We are fortunate to have so many amazing species here. Cortes is not been as developed as some of the other islands. We still have large intact areas of forest and a really good marine ecosystem,” said Hall. Some species still evidenced here are disappearing from other areas because of habitat loss and degradation.  Northern Goshawk Cortes Currents: Roy L Hales interview Helen Hall & Autumn Barret Morgan from the Friends of Cortes Island “We have the Northern Goshawk on the island … and we know they have disappeared from other parts of the province.” According to the FOCI website, “ … It is suspected that the Northern Goshawk’s numbers will continue to decline due to deforestation of mature and old-growth forests. Commercial clearcutting destroys their nesting habitat and reduces prey abundance.” Fourteen Species At Risk Fourteen Species at Risk are featured on the FOCI website. “I think that if no conservation programs are in place, they are all ultimately at risk of either extirpation (disappearance locally) or extinction, but I wouldn’t say right now.” They range from recently returned Humpback Whales to the Great Blue Heron. “We also have species like...
The National Observer’s Cortes Connection

The National Observer’s Cortes Connection

This radio broadcast was funded by a grant from the Community Radio Fund of Canada and the Government of Canada’s Local Journalism Initiative.  Many of you probably know Linda Solomon Wood as the Editor-in-Chief of the NATIONAL OBSERVER, but the award winning investigative journalist lived on Cortes Island for five years after 9/11. While she currently lives in Vancouver, Linda returns every summer. A few months ago her publication hired a reporter to cover Cortes and Quadra Islands. In this morning’s interview I asked LInda Solomon Wood about her life, career in journalism and the National Observer’s Cortes connection. LInda Solomon Wood A Passion For People’s Stories “My biggest passion is people. I love talking to people, I love hearing people’s stories. I like the way journalism is  a passport into the interesting lives of other people and their stories. That’s really what motivates me, finding the next great story.” The first story she remembers writing as a little girl in Chattanooga, Tennessee, was about mandatory school busing.  “ … I remember there would be this guy standing in front of the high school going ‘last call for the ghetto express.’ So it was a story about that guy, and what that time was like - from the point of view of a thirteen-year-old.”  Solomon Wood obtained an intern job writing obituaries and wedding notices “in the basement of the Greenfield Recorder’s office” in Massachusetts. She studied journalism at Northwestern and later became a full time reporter for the Tennessean. She was 20 or 21 at that time.  Linda Solomon Wood with President Jimmy Carter The Big Things Journalism Can Do “A lot of...