Vinho do Porto

Vinho do Porto

This week Podcast Dulce Pontes won the Portuguese Song Contest in 1991 with the song “Lusitana Paixao” (Lusitanian Passion), so she represented Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest that same year. Are you curious about the song? Episode 107 - Vinho do Porto Susana Vijaya was born in Porto, Portugal. After a strong career in sales as a commercial director, she founded and ran a flourishing vegetarian and macrobiotic restaurant that evolved to feed the body, mind and soul as a spiritual center for holistic healing. In 2008 she moved to Brazil and in 2012 she found Cortes Island and started to spend her Summers there. She has a passion for music since she can remember. Her grandmother was always listening to Fado and she was always surrounded by musicians and Djs that opened her taste to a lot of different genres. Coming to Cortes island, she made her debut in the 2015 Lip Sync and has been one of the regular performers since then, participating as well at the newest CKTZ Cabaret. With these performances she realized how much she loves to share her culture and how much Cortesians love to receive it. Susana and Lyle at the CKTZ Lip Sync on Quadra Island, August 2017 Vinho do Porto Show So she decided to have her own radio show, where she can share all her Portuguese music background, being that from Portugal, from the ex Portuguese colonies or Brazil. Vinho do Porto show has as a common thread, all songs in Portuguese language, and the genres varies between Fado, Rock, Pop, Blues, Dance, Samba, Jazz, Reggae, Hip-Hop, Folk, Bossa...
Jonas & Amy: The Misty Isles New Owners

Jonas & Amy: The Misty Isles New Owners

Originally Published on Cortes Currents Many of you are probably aware that Cortes Island’s best known schooner has changed hands. After twenty-one years of showing tourists around our area, Mike Moore and Samantha Statton are retiring. I recently met with the Misty Isles new owners, Amy Bockner and Jonas Fineman, outside the Co-op in Mansons Landing.  Who Are They? “My early childhood [was spent] on the water – on a float house that my parents dragged off the land .. I think we spent four years living off that in Gorge Harbour … I loved it. We would row out to our house … Going fishing with my dad for our diner and all that stuff . My earliest memories were all there …” – Amy Bockner “I grew up on the Central Oregon Coast, literally right on the Pacific Ocean … I wasn’t really good at football or wrestling, which is what you had to be to be good at anything growing up on that part of the coast, but the ocean gave me a safe haven and and a lot of lessons that were mine and really beneficial. It became my solace mostly manifested through surfing, swimming and gradually propelling me towards earning a living on the water.” – Jonas Fineman In The Podcast Above:  What is Amy Bockner’s connection to Cortes Island?Why did Jonas Fineman become first a fisherman and then captain of a tourist vessel? What does Amy bring to the partnership?How did they become owners of the schooner? When will Jonas come home to be the Misty Isles captain?What are Jonas and Amy’s plans for the future? The 2019...
Review: These Are My Words

Review: These Are My Words

As an immigrant to Canada, I was shocked to learn about the Canadian legacy of residential schools. I had no idea growing up in the U.S. that such things were happened and had happened just north of the border. The indigenous residential schools operated in Canada starting in the 1870s with the last one not closing until1996. Children as young as four were taken—often against the will of their families or with coercive techniques such as threatening jail time—and it is estimated that over 150,000 Indian, Inuit, and Métis children attended residential school. I was reminded that it is a  legacy that continues to shade aspects of Canadian culture and identity for all Canadians this year when I became a citizen. At the ceremony, the judge encouraged all of us new Canadians to make the act of reconciliation personal and spoke about how she was doing that in her life.  Can We Understand? How does one take on such an enormous task of try to make better—or even understand—a system like residential school? It feels like an enormous task but one as an immigrant and as a mother that I want to take seriously. “Too many Canadians know little or nothing about the deep historical roots of these conflicts. This lack of knowledge has serious consequences for First Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples and for Canada,” counsels the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in their Final Report.  History is important because it allows us as a people to look at the dark aspects of our history to make our way toward a lighter future. But where to begin? One of the ways...
From Port Nevill To Cape Scott

From Port Nevill To Cape Scott

Originally Published on Cortes Currents In this morning’s program we conclude Jeanette Taylor’s presentation 60 Terrific Historical Spots to Visit on Northern Vancouver Island by looking at sites between Port Neville & Cape Scott. “When I started going [to Port Neville] about ten years ago it was still operating as a post office. Even though there is not more than ten people in the whole region, they hung on for dear life to their post office. They still had the original cancellation stamp from the 1890s there. So I had a stamp collector on one of the tours that I do there who was .. just shaking with excitement about writing a letter, putting a stamp on it and having it cancelled in the Port Neville Post Office.” – Jeanette Taylor From Port Neville To Cape Scott On Cortes Currents about 9 AM Wed, May 22, repeats 5 PM May 28 How Hans Hansen lost his hand and rowed from Vancouver to Port NevilleThree generations of the Hansen family at Port Neville The early Danish settlers at Cape ScottAfter three generations, one of Sontula’s residents still has a Finish accentWhy did the Hudsons Bay Company come to Fort Rupert?The petroglyphs and village at Fort RupertWhat’s the story behind Village Island? Where is New Vancouver?What its like to resettle an abandoned village site.Early settlers and villagers at Kingcome InletMarianne Nicholson’s cliff painting and other exhibitionsJudith William’s Book: “Two Wolves at the Dawn of Time: Kingcome Inlet Pictographs, 1893-1998”The 3,751 year-old tree at Watson’’s LakeBilly Proctor’s Museum at Echo BayNikki van Schyndel’s book: Becoming Wild: Living the Primitive Life on a West Coast Island Billy Proctor “has charisma and young women love him. He was raised by his...
Word Of The Day

Word Of The Day

Koosen & Amaya Koosen Pielle is a young mother of two in the Tla’amin nation. She has been involved in language revitalization for going on 7 years. She specializes and has a passion for audio , and getting a “Word of the day” started for CKTZ radio (funded by CRFC Radiometres) was a natural next step in language revitalization. “Language needs to be embedded in every part of our lives… it’s an emergency now, to regulate it as much as possible and to decolonize our ear holes! Especially while we still have the resource people that we do have” Koosen says. Koosen has included elders from the Klahoose community in the word of the day she created. She’s also included singers from both the Tla’amin nation, Klahoose Nation, and the settler community for background music. “Culture is something we all have in common, it unites us and it brings all generations together…and that is when the real magic happens…when intergenerational learning is a possibility”. Koosen expresses her love for community radio because it is “a means of oral teachings”. May 2019 “Taxumay” - translation “Red Cedar” “Soput” - translation “to split something with an axe” “shehmatchxw” - translation “Dry it” April 2019 “sew sew” - translation “stinging nettle” “qoo_ohmqoo ” - translation “cod eggs” (?) “qoay” - translation “hemlock” “pixay” - translation “alder” “pahyeetga”- translation “say it again” March 2019 Marissa’s story “kwawitl” - translation “spruce pitch” “kwakwajehthote” - translation “being In pain” “klupxwat”  - translation “to break something” February 2019 “Hoga” - translation “go ahead” Ayajuthum Elders ʔayʔaǰuθəm dictionary The ʔayʔaǰuθəm speaking people live among four communities: ɬəʔamɛn,...
Doug Weyler

Doug Weyler

The Cortes Craft Shop is now open for the spring season, so in this episode of Art on the Island Maureen Bader covers the history of the craft shop with someone who participated in the construction of the building back in 1987, Doug Weyler.  Maureen Bader Doug Weyler on Art on the Island The craft shop opened on May 18, weekends only from 12 noon to 4pm. The summer season runs between July 1 and September 1 from 10am to 5pm and the fall season from September 2-15, from 12 noon to 4pm.  Doug had been on the island for a year when construction began. He came to Cortes from Colorado, where he was teaching art in a college. He had been coming to the island since 1982 to teach art at Hollyhock.  Although Doug was a painter and taught watercolour, he now does leatherwork and carving, which you can see at the craft shop or his home studio. Doug carves in both bone and gemstones, and highlights some of his leather bags with bone carvings.  Doug helped build the craft shop back in 1987. Part of the construction group included Pierre and Wendy LeTrey, Irene Blueth and Robin Bracewell, who now lives in Portugal, but what really impressed Doug was that most of the builders were island women. Listen as Doug describes what he calls the Island woman. They are amazing, he says. The Klahoose offered the space and were very important in the building of the Craft Shop. Two elders from Klahoose cut the opening day ribbon.  Doreen Reedel and friend All the construction was done with...
Klahoose Language Program

Klahoose Language Program

Norm Harry hosts the Klahoose Language Program on Cortes Radio, CKTZ 89.5 FM, 2:30 - 4 PM on Wednesdays. “Thank-you from coming to the Klahoose territory* .… We say it with a good heart so that people feel welcome, not like an outcast. Especially when I am on the radio show. This is all our island. We have to share it as a home, even though it is the territory of the Klahoose people. You don’t get pushy about it, you do it in a polite manner so that everybody is equal. ” - Norm Harry, from an interview on Cortes Currents. Each Klahoose Language program podcast starts with a Word of the Day, which is followed by Norm’s program. The Klahoose Language Program and word of the day are sponsored by the Community Radio Fund of Canada. (Click here to access a separate page for Word of the Day) Here are some recent podcasts: May 2019 May 15 Klahoose Program May 8 Klahoose Program May 1 Klahoose Program April 2019 April 24 Klahoose Program April 17 Klahoose Program April 10 Klahoose Program April 3 Klahoose Program March 2019 March 27 Klahoose Program March 20 Klahoose Program March 13 Klahoose Program March 6 Klahoose Program February 2019 Feb 27 Klahoose Program Feb 20 Klahoose Program Feb 13 Klahoose Program Feb 6 Klahoose Program January 2019 Jan 30 Klahoose Program Jan 23 Klahoose Program Jan 16 Klahoose Program Jan 9, Klahoose...
Jeanette Taylor Part 2: Discovery Islands & More

Jeanette Taylor Part 2: Discovery Islands & More

Little girls in the tub, Schnarrs from Bute Inlet. courtesy Campbell River Museum Originally published on Cortes Currents.  In this morning’s Cortes Currents, we continue with the audio from Jeanette Taylor’s recent talk at Manson’s Hall. In the previous episode she talked about Old Quadra Island. Now we explore the rest of the Discovery Islands & more. “I just love that reef off the south tip of Marina Island. It is like another planet or something walking around on that reef at low tide. … It is really hard to photograph, but you can see it sneaking out far over to this side and then edging back in. That is a really long reef and I won’t tell you the full story but there is a wonderful aboriginal myth about the dog children which was collected in the 1880s and tells the story of how that reef and the one off south Cortes was formed.” – Jeanette Taylor In The Podcast Whaletown on Cortes Island: The Old The old church at Whaletown & Why should you visit Mittlenatch Island?Gorge Harbour’s petroglyphs When did the Spanish and English come to Teakerne Arm on West Redonda? (See also: How Did Toba Inlet Get It’s Name? )Who were the Moses & Martin Lucey buried on West Redonda in 1892?The Chilcotin War of 1864August Schnarr, his daughters and Bute InletWho were the first Europeans to visit Nootka Sound? Petroglyphs at Gorge Harbour, Cortes Island – courtesy Jeanette Taylor Alfred Waddington’s Dream “In the early 1860s, during the Gold Rush in BC, the engineer in Victoria named Waddington was looking for a new route to get in there that was less arduous...
End of the Road Show

End of the Road Show

Hello listeners, my is Gregg aka Hiway Hippy. I came to Cortes Radio with my End of the Road Show the first week of June 2018. Funny thing is the station was the first building I entered upon my arrival to the island back in May. Drawn in by the hometown ambiance and the endless volumes of music I was instantly caught hook, line and sinker.   I didn’t know exactly how I would find a space to fill but I knew in my heart that I could add my own twist into ‘Puttin the Freak into Frequency’. Fortunately I was able to meet Howie while moving a local fellow and we set the wheels in motion for a chance at becoming a D.J. 3 day’s later we had an impromptu training session and as they say, the rest is history and I’ve been spinning the tunes Friday afternoons starting at 3pm through till 7pm. Podcasts Episode 16 - End of the Road Show Episode 15 - End of the Road Show Episode 14 - End of the Road Show Episode 9 - End of The Road Show Music Tastes   I have a wide variety of music tastes but the one thing I try to do is play Hard Rock and Alternative in 1 hour long sets. This program has been a work in progress with many hurdles to cross being mostly transient. Most of the summer was spent sailing, stopping by the station to pre-record the show for later airing. I now have a laptop dedicated to music and the production of radio and karaoke shows. This coupled...
Interviewing Sue Hall

Interviewing Sue Hall

originally published on Cortes Currents This week’s guest at Folk University’s Folk U Friday series was Sue Hall author of Fish Don’t Climb Trees, head of the Whole Dyslexic Society, and Davis Dyslexia facilitator. Sue Hall is also dyslexic and the mother of a dyslexic child and has taught a positive-based approached to working with dyslexia for 20 years. She talked about how to fid the gift in so-called learning disabilities and work with dyslexia in a positive way. Please listen to the CKTZ podcast for a brief interview with Sue Hall or visit https://thegreenmama.com/learning-differences/ to read more about dyslexia and learning differences.  What is a Learning Difference? One of the technical prerequisites of a learning disorder diagnosis is the possession of at least an average (and often above average) IQ, along with difficulties in processing spoken or written language or symbols. Thus, by definition, someone with a diagnosed learning disorder is “smart,” yet they may struggle with reading or writing or doing basic math. This is very different from an intellectual disability, signifying a cognitive capacity that is below average.  There can be learning differences that occur for a variety of reasons, though not all are considered learning disorders. Learning differences we typically hear about include dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). While all of these can affect a person’s learning, the medical and educational communities do not consider ADHD and ASD learning disorders.  So what is considered a learning disorder? Dyslexia, dysgraphia, and dyscalculia are common examples of learning disorders according to the medical and educational communities:  Dyslexia is the broadest of these “dys-es”, and affects the way a person relates...