The Three Musketeers

The Three Musketeers

Episode 4 brings us the songs “Going to a Party” and “Seasons Change” from the Three Musketeers. “Going to a Party” channels the excitement of going to a party and having a great time! A track that invites you seek out the ones you enjoy spending time with, cut loose and crank some loud tunes. “Seasons Change” is a reflective piece that explores the beauty and intrigue of the changing seasons, while employing engaging melody pairings and pacing. Episode Four - The Three Musketeers Coming to you from the unceded, ancestral territories of the Klahoose, Homalco, and Tla’amin peoples, this is Spark Point Music Radio! We are working in partnership with CKTZ Cortes radio, Youth Voices!, and The Community Radio Fund of Canada - Radiometres program to bring you original music created by youth from Cortes Island. At Spark Point Music we believe that when we create, we explore what it is to be whole and discover more of who we truly are. In our programs we seek to spark the imagination, and a sense of what is possible, for youth on the remote island of Cortes when their voices are heard and valued. We give youth ages 8 to 18 an opportunity to create art and music in an encouraging environment, seeking to minimize judgment and increase acceptance of themselves and others. Our studio is graciously hosted at Linnaea Farm, where we provide inclusive space, instruments, recording gear, and guidance for youth to compose, record, and perform original music. Any music you hear during these broadcasts was either composed and performed entirely by youth, or with the guidance...
Qʷaqʷθamčxʷ “You tell a story!”

Qʷaqʷθamčxʷ “You tell a story!”

The Klahoose Nation invited youth from Tla’Amin, Komoks, and Homalco to spend a weekend learning to create podcasts.  The Sister Nations to Klahoose share the same language: ʔayʔaǰuθəm (Ayajuthem.) These youth were encouraged to use the language throughout the camp and as a part of the stories they chose to share.  While learning how to use sound recording and editing equipment, the youth enjoyed experiential games that focused on the Sounds of the Land. Audio Ethnographer Jenni Shine led youth on a Sound Walk to introduce the idea of deep listening, which was many participants favourite part.  Learning storytelling techniques was a significant part of the camp, however, the most important part was connecting these youth to each other at an early age. This opportunity for them to explore their beautiful land and spend time together sharing their songs and skills provided an opportunity for an earlier connection between youth in the Sister Nations.     We recognize and appreciate all the support and funding provided by CKTZ, CRFC,  CCHA, Tides Canada, and the Klahoose Nation. Also to Rosemary, Jacqueline, Dan, Odette, Koosen, Gary, Mariko and Zoe.  ʔi:mot (Thank you.) Qʷaqʷθamčxʷ “You tell a story!” Podcasts Episode 6 - You tell a story! - Documentary This episode is a documentary featuring recordings taken during the Ayajuthem weekend camp.  It gives a behind the scenes look at the weekend with insightful interviews, traditional songs, recordings from workshops and teaching sessions, and more! You Tell A Story: Episode 6 - Documentary Episode 5 - You tell a story! - Evelyn / Dion, Matthew, and Stanley This episode features Evelyn, from the Keeseekoose First...
Barry & Amanda Glickman

Barry & Amanda Glickman

Originally Published on Cortes Currents While many Cortes Islanders associate them with emergency communications, there is a great deal more to Barry & Amanda Glickman’s story. “If you have DNA damage from radiation, if it is repaired accurately it is not going to lead to cancer, but if it is repaired with some-error rate, that error rate ultimately leads to cancer. But one of the things at that time is that we didn’t know if the people who repaired well made errors which caused cancer, or if people who repaired poorly didn’t repair and that problem led to cancer. So we were quite ignorant of that relationship and in a way we still are.” – Dr Barry Glickman, Founder of the Centre for Environmental Health (now the Centre for Biomedical Research), University of Victoria.  In The Podcast:  Dr Barry Glickman’s pioneer work with radiation genetics in Canada, the United States and various locations around the World. The radiation accident in Goiânia, Brazil; five years in Brazil with a research team. After Chernobyl, world’s biggest nuclear accident, Working with the Canadian and Soviet Space Agency on the challenges of radiation when considering travel to Mars. HIV studies in Africa. (Access 219 of B W Glickman’s research articles,)How a Victoria girl like Amanda ended up working for a synthetic biology company called Diversa in San Diego; Why she did not complete her doctorate.Barry & Amanda went sailing for almost ten years. Following John Steinbeck’s “Log from the Sea of Cortez“; Their book “Patagonia Through The Eyes Of Darwin”Last years with the University of Victoria, studying how birds spread nutrients through forestsWhy traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) is...
Spring 2019 on the Homegrown Show

Spring 2019 on the Homegrown Show

“Welcome to the Homegrown Show, and I am your host, Hurricane Rena. The Homegrown show is a radio show played on CKTZ Cortes Island Community radio, 89.5 fm. It’s on from 1-3 Sunday afternoons and features local musicians from Quadra, Cortes, and Vancouver Island. A lot of Canadian music is played, songs that celebrate our unique lifestyle in the islands of the BC Coast and Western Canada in general. You can hear music on my show that you don’t often hear anywhere else, as well as poetry. The Homegrown show began celebrating our unique lifestyle in song during March of 2011, around the time of the super moon, closest the moon will be to the Earth in 27000 years.” – from Hurricane Rena’s website Summer 2019 Aug 11, 2019 Program July 28, 2019, Program July 14, 2019, Program June 2019 June 30, 2019 Program June 16, 2019 Program June 2, 2019, Program May 2019 May 26 , 2019, Program May 12, 2019 Program April 2019 April 28, 2019 Program April 14, 2019, program March 2019 March 31, 2019 Program March 24, 2019 Program March 10, 2019 program March 3, 2019 Program The Homegrown Show’s other Podcast Pages Homegrown Show - Winter 2018/19Homegrown Show - Fall 2018Homegrown Show - Summer...
Jewaka & Heakami Rivers Threatened

Jewaka & Heakami Rivers Threatened

Originally Published on Cortes Currents More than a quarter of the planet’s population do not have access to sufficient clean water. While this problem is usually associated with developing nations, England and the United States are expected to face serious shortages in the decades to come. Meanwhile, British Columbia continues to give our water away for next to nothing. In this morning’s program, Judith Williams raises concerns about a private company coveting a large drainage area just north of Bute Inlet, British Columbia. The public may lose access to the Jewaka & Heakami Rivers. The Jewaka & Heakami rivers drain off the Homathko icefield, a thirty-mile-in diameter ice plateau, just north of Bute Inlet.  What Are We Willing To Give Away? Proposed Run of River sites (in yellow) draining into Bute Inlet, and power lines in red – adapted from map by Roy L Hales “These applications for water rights have long tenure. They would involve enormous earth moving, tunnelling, road building and a general disruption of this area. We would not have access to the area during that tenure. It would be private and also they would have access to the water off the ice field…” “I think we allow applications like this, and sometimes they are approved, without anyone really noticing. Then the commons – our common ground – is privatized for long, long periods of time. I think we should think, long and hard, about what we are willing to give away for, often, not a great deal of money.” – Judith Williams    Heakami River – Courtesy Judith Williams In The Podcast The Jewaka & Heakami rivers are a major fish spawning...
Hannah Petkau and Francesca Belcourt

Hannah Petkau and Francesca Belcourt

In this episode of Art on the Island Maureen Bader talks to artists Hannah Petkau and Francesca Belcourt.  Both Hannah and Francesca grew up on Cortes Island and come back every summer to connect with people here. Hannah and Francesca have a collaborative show on at the Schoolhouse Gallery between July 26 and August 4 called Pooling. This show is a collection of what lures them back to the Island and carries them forward. The work reflects the experiences that shape the trajectory of their work.   Maureen Bader Hannah has been an artist for a long as she can remember and Francesca joined in with Hannah once they got to know each other her on the Island as children. Both Hannah and Francesca talk about their background, including an artist residency in Spain. Hannah strives for balance in her artwork and this is reflected in her life. Both have worked in many media Francesca’s parents are artists so art was a big part of her childhood, and she has taken on a graphic sense and is interested in illustration. Listen as Francesca talks about how she was drawn to music. Francesca has been recording since she was nine and learned about music production in High School in Campbell River. Francesca has been self-producing music since then and continues today in her home in London, England. Hannah talks about how she developed her sculptures - by collecting items over the years - and how the arrangement references a garden in bloom, an ocean ecosystem and a collective of people gathered in celebration. Francesca designed the sound component of the...
Confusion, Misunderstandings & Misguided Allegations

Confusion, Misunderstandings & Misguided Allegations

The opinions that follow are those of the author, not necessarily the Cortes Radio Society, its board, staff, volunteers or members. Originally Published on Cortes Currents While a couple of Director Anderson’s actions contributed to the confusion, she was almost invariably on the receiving end of the abuse. The July 24th Electoral Area Service Committee (EASC) meeting was plagued by confusion, misunderstandings and misguided allegations. The July 24th EASC Meeting Directors Whalley and Leigh both complained about the way Cortes Regional Director Anderson runs to the board whenever EASC denies her an application. She has been doing it for years, or so they thought. Chief Administrative Office David Leitch explained it is standard operating procedure for denied applications to go before the board. Committees make recommendations; the final decision is made by the board. (As a rule, the board follows the committee’s recommendation.) FOCI Transportation Coordinator Funding The Friends of Cortes Island (FOCI) application for funding to hire a transportation co-ordinator was once again denied. This initiative arose out of a 2017 SRD Transportation Study. Leitch said it is SRD staff’s job to find ways of implementing it, not an outside organization like FOCI. Two years have passed since the study. Cortes Regional Director Noba Anderson asked, “Why did staff not  … bring forward a report that said ‘hey, here is how we can action some of this?’” Leitch replied that they had not been asked. The proper avenue for this is the director’s annual one-on-one conversation, with staff, at budget time.  Director Anderson will bring this up at the “November 13th one on one.” (Some irresponsible comments about specific Cortes residents, FOCI and Director Anderson are...
Eclectic Selection

Eclectic Selection

The Eclectic Collection reflects my love of music, in itís many forms. The rock and roll and blues and folk songs of my youth, jazz, classical and Celtic of later years, all make an appearance during the show. Not the top 40 hits, unless there is no option, but the live versions, the covers by other artists, the hidden gems deep in the albums that never got airplay Podcasts JUly 23, 2019 July 2, 2019 June 18, 2019 June 11, 2019 June 4, 2019 - Eclectic Selection May 28, 2019 - Eclectic Selection Jan 15, 2019 - Eclectic Selection My Passion The magic of the internet lets me indulge my passion in finding new tunes to love, new artists to share. Whether it’s an old rocker with a new album, or an up and coming new artist, if I like it, I’ll share it on air. It’s not enough though to just play a bunch of songs I like. I try to weave songs together to tell a tale, to set a mood, spark feelings. In other words, I have fun putting together each show. It has been a long road from spinning 45s for my high-school radio club to CKTZ, with many years of internet pirate radio in between. While “Keemo’s Eclectic Classics” had a similar format, it did not feature as much new material. Doing legit radio lets me pay back for my pirate ways by playing new acts, new stuff. Beyond my normal ambling search for new to me songs, I’ve added deliberate searches for Canadian acts, and in respect for the people’s whose lands we...
Rex Weyler’s Music

Rex Weyler’s Music

While better known as an environmentalist and one of the co-founders of Greenpeace, some of Rex’s earliest memories involve singing. “Being with a group of people and making music together is one of the most intense forms of communication I’ve ever experienced.” In this morning’s interview we explore a little of Rex Weyler’s music.  Beginnings of Rex Weyler’s Music “I did not have any musical training. Our family did not have a piano. We didn’t have any guitars around. I just sang songs and made up the verses. Often when we were travelling in a car, I’d just sit there and sing Hank Williams songs to myself – making up the verses. It wasn’t until I was 19-years-old that a friend of mine taught me how to play the guitar and , in fact, gave me a guitar . A whole other world opened up for me, because then I could hear the notes … and the cord changes, the rhythm and so forth – and so I have been writing songs ever since.” When he was In his twenties, Rex travelled all over the world – from North America to Europe, the Middle East and India. He took his guitar everywhere.  “I spent a lot of time on my own: learning, playing, playing with other people … picking up guitar skills and basically learning how to play. I played in a couple of bands and wrote some songs in the 70s and 80s. Then I moved to Cortes in 1981 and continued to write songs here … Eventually I kept thinking, I should record these songs.”  Rex (on mic) with other...
Radio In A Box Test

Radio In A Box Test

Cortes Radio possesses a technology that will enable it to continue broadcasting even if a major disaster takes out the grid and internet. On July 19, Shaun Koopman Protective Services Coordinator for the Strathcona Regional District, brought a team of volunteers from Campbell River and Gold River.  For about twenty minutes, CKTZ stopped broadcasting through-out 99% of its area while, in the parking lot in front of the station, we performed CKTZ’s first successful Radio-in-a-box test. CKTZ’s Radio In A Box Test In the podcast above you will hear Lorne Gottschewski, from CKTZ’s Eclectic Selection, announce, “We’re testing the CKTZ emergency broadcast system. Please be patient, we will return to normal programming any moment.”  It was shortly after noon during Mansons Friday Market. In the background of the photo I took of Lorne’s broadcast, you can see Barry Glickman and Howie Roman in the CKTZ booth. There are a number of parked cars in the picture of Alex Michaels, beside the new three tier station that he built so we can keep our radio-in-a box assembled and ready to use. A cluster of spectators assembled to watch us. Koopman muttered that he wished we’d let him know it would be market day. (Oops.)  The first sign of success came through people listening to the radio through their cel phones.  Then Sharon Johnson, from the Gold River Emergency Communication Team, reported, “I was just down by the Co-op and i could hear the broadcast coming through the radio-in-a-box. It was a little scratchy, but came through okay.” Lorne Gottschewski, from CKTZ’s Eclectic Selection, broadcasting over radio in a box. Alex...