Awakening The Canoes

Awakening The Canoes

[REPOST FROM JUNE 24, 2018] What was the role of the canoe in pre-contact indigenous culture? What caused its decline? And how are canoe journeys finding their way back to Klahoose and her sister nations? In this episode, producer Roy Hales outlines the awakening of the canoes. Awaken The Canoes Roy L Hales/ Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/Awakening+the+Canoes+mp3+Master.mp3 “The significance of the canoe was undeniable. Almost every person, or every second person had access to a canoe. We know so little about the canoe culture when you consider that in the totality of First Nations, how important it was. It carried us to food; it carried our relations from community to community; it made economics possible…” - Jodi Simkin, Director, Cultural Affairs and Heritage, Klahoose First Nation. In 1884: “The Canadian Government decided they were going to keep us restricted to reserves and we had to ask permission to leave. If I wanted to visit my grandmother, I wait for the Indian Agent to come and I’d say, ‘I want to travel to Ladysmith to visit my grandmother.’ I had to get a pass to leave the community.” – Michelle Robinson, Social Development Manager and councillor, Klahoose Nation The awakening started in 1989, with what has become an annual event for First Nations along the West Coast from Alaska to California. This summer the Klahoose take part in their second tribal journey: the Power Paddle to Puyallup . Washington, where they join in a celebration (July 28 – August 4, 2018) consisting of singing, dancing, stories and sharing food. Roy L Hales is a former President of the Cortes Radio Society (CKTZ 89.5 FM), where he...
How Did Toba Inlet Get Its Name?

How Did Toba Inlet Get Its Name?

[REPOST FROM JUNE 22, 2018] Toba is not an English word, or Coast Salish. The first Europeans to visit this remote fjord on the West Coast of British Columbia were Spanish. Deep Roots story producer Roy L Hales interviews Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse, from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian Judith Williams to ask How did Toba Inlet get its name? How Did Toba Inlet Get Its Name by Roy L Hales | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/How+Toba+Got+It%27s+Name+mp3+Master.mp3 On June 24, 1792, Captain Dionisio Alcalá Galiano made the following log entry for his schooner Sutil: “At sunset [Captain Cayetano] Valdés returned. He had followed the Canal de la Tabla and inspected the vicinity. [The inlet], which appeared [of] considerable [width] at its beginning, came to an end in a few leagues; its shores were very high, with sharp peaks, its depth great, and the inlets he saw were full of small islands. On its east shore Valdés found a plank [tabla], for which he named the inlet and of which he made a drawing. It was covered with paintings, which were apparently hieroglyphics of the natives. He found some abandoned villages, but not one inhabitant.”  How Did Tobla Inlet Get Its Name? Where is this mysterious tablet with hieroglyphic writing today? What did the writing say? Why is this important to the Klahoose Nation? If the Spanish gave Tobla Inlet its name, why does their log entry say “the Canal de la Tabla” rather than Tobla Inlet? Roy L Hales is a former President of the Cortes Radio Society (CKTZ 89.5 FM), where he has hosted a news radio program since 2014, and also...
The Klahoose Arborglyph

The Klahoose Arborglyph

British Columbia is known for its totem poles. Examples of a less known artwork have surfaced in more recent years. Aborglyphs are carved into living trees. One was discovered a few years ago, two hundred kilometres north of Vancouver in the midst of a clearcut in Toba Inlet. The Klahoose Arborglyh has been moved to the band’s multipurpose building in Squirrel Cove, Cortes Island. Deep Roots story producer Roy L Hales interviewed Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse, from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian Judith Williams about the arborglyph that survived into modern times. The Klahoose Arborglyph The Klahoose Arborglyph - Ken Hanuse photo The Klahoose Arborglyph by Roy L Hales, Deep Roots Island Waves The Klahoose arborglyph is believed to have been a marker on the pre-contact trail between Toba Inlet and the Upper Squamish Valley. Why Is The Arborglyph Important? “Its a reminder of who we are and our connection to the land. So there are many many markers that would have been out there, but … [the land] has been logged. So this is one that survived and it is here now. “For Klahoose people it is really important. There is pieces … [of our past] that our kids need to know about because there has been so much lost already. So if it wasn’t there and it wasn’t brought here, it could have been taken down by another logging company. There are still cruel people out there that would just go up there and take it down because they don’t want us to be connected to the land.” - Michelle Robinson, Social Development Officer and Band Councillor, Klahoose First Nation...
Cultivating Traditional Health

Cultivating Traditional Health

Recent research and long held traditions around health and food have challenged conventional practices of making available and promoting high carbohydrate, sugary, processed foods for convenience and economy. Some studies now conclude that animal fats have more to do with maintaining good health than eating the previously recommended low fat diet. Traditional Indigenous diets clearly show how eating from one’s own environment suits our overall well being and health. The experiences of our ancestors also has been shown to inform our own genetics, affecting our present day to day life. In this episode of Deep Roots Island Waves, Producer Manda Aufochs Gillespie links place, food, genetic history and health for insight into possibilities for understanding how we’re much more than we eat.” Klahoose canoe Tl’emtl’ems leaves Squirrel Cove, Cortes Island, for the Paddle to Puyallop on July 14, 2018 - Roy L Hales photo Cultivating Traditional Health by Manda Aufochs Gillespie, Deep Roots Island Waves Traditional Health & Epigenetics “This story of salmon boy is a fantastical creation myth and it is a story of how essential animals were to one indigenous community. Or how the health of a people in intricately connected to the health of their food source. This connection is behind one of today’s newest science buzzwords, epigenetics. “Epigenectics is the study of how the expression of our genes can be turned up or down by environmental factors. We are learning that things we once considered hardwired, such as our tendency towards obesity, heart disease and even schizophrenia can be influenced by our grandparent’s diets or something like our great grandparent’s exposure to certain chemicals, or...
Language Warrior

Language Warrior

Language Warrior is a story about Jessie Louie, and her life’s work preserving and revitalizing ʔayʔaǰuθəm a distinct dialect of Northern Salishan. Jessie knows the value of reclaiming language as a source of strength; a treasure to preserve, and a key to survival. Jesse Louie Language Warrior by Odette Auger, Deep Roots Island Waves There is only one fully fluent speaker left who speaks this at Klahoose, and less than a dozen fully fluent speakers in total left on our planet. This is why the name Language Warrior truly is fitting. The good news.. Linguists say even endangered languages can revive, if people have a choice, and an opportunity to learn. Jessie shares her story on how residential school attempted to stifle her language, and how she lived a life working to hand her language down to younger generations… “there is hope… I know it will carry on through these young people who put their heart and soul into it”. Odette Auger, Sagamok Anishnabek: The past 5 years have been focused on fundraising and project management, youth programming. With Deep Roots and Island Waves, I have thoroughly enjoyed the collaborative process, and am excited to have facilitated new and ancient talent, skills, specialists and voices to our community. The opportunity to also write and produce in this series is an...
Toba: The Heart Home

Toba: The Heart Home

Toba Inlet is the glacier blue artery punching into the heart of the Toba River Valley and its mountainous flanks to access the mainland body of Klahoose traditional territory. Toba: The Heart Home Toba: The Heart Home by Rochelle Baker, Deep Roots Island Waves An entity in and of itself, Toba resources were, and continue to be, vital to Klahoose survival, culture and economic well-being. The notion place can have affect on those that reside there is ancient and widespread in human history. The Toba has shaped and has been shaped by the Klahoose, and the settlers, homesteaders and loggers who followed. The story of Toba: The Heart Home is how living in his people’s traditional territory profoundly shaped a young boy. And, how that experience built a foundation of resilience, and forged an inspirational bond with an ancestor, both of which he’d draw upon to surmount challenges later in life.  Rochelle Baker, reformed newspaper reporter and former urban princess, recently moved to the Discovery Islands to try and recapture the enchantment of her childhood summers on Cortes Island. The sound of the radio was a permanent feature in her home growing up, and remains so today. Working with the Deep Roots collective and learning from the Klahoose Nation was a step in fulfilling a long-time dream of sharing the magic of stories over the airwaves and as a window into people’s...