How Did Toba Inlet Get Its Name?

How Did Toba Inlet Get Its Name?

Toba is not an English word, or Coast Salish. The first Europeans to visit this remote fjord on the West Coast of British Columbia were Spanish. Deep Roots story producer Roy L Hales interviews Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse, from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian Judith Williams to ask How did Toba Inlet get its name? How Did Toba Inlet Get Its Name by Roy L Hales | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/How+Toba+Got+It%27s+Name+mp3+Master.mp3 On June 24, 1792, Captain Dionisio Alcalá Galiano made the following log entry for his schooner Sutil: “At sunset [Captain Cayetano] Valdés returned. He had followed the Canal de la Tabla and inspected the vicinity. [The inlet], which appeared [of] considerable [width] at its beginning, came to an end in a few leagues; its shores were very high, with sharp peaks, its depth great, and the inlets he saw were full of small islands. On its east shore Valdés found a plank [tabla], for which he named the inlet and of which he made a drawing. It was covered with paintings, which were apparently hieroglyphics of the natives. He found some abandoned villages, but not one inhabitant.”  How Did Tobla Inlet Get Its Name? Where is this mysterious tablet with hieroglyphic writing today? What did the writing say? Why is this important to the Klahoose Nation? If the Spanish gave Tobla Inlet its name, why does their log entry say “the Canal de la Tabla” rather than Tobla Inlet? Roy L Hales is the President of the Cortes Radio Society (CKTZ 89.5 FM), where he has hosted a half hour program since 2014, and editor of the the ECOreport, a website dedicated to exploring how...
Coming Of Age With Deep Roots

Coming Of Age With Deep Roots

Settlers and immigrants in coastal BC are like driftwood tossed onto a shore where trees still stand. We came from afar to live among First Nations still connected to their roots. Some of us wonder what it’s like to be connected to the place of one’s ancestral roots and how ancient traditions nourish current generations. In this edition of Deep Roots Island Waves, Michelle Robinson tells story producer Carrie Saxifrages her experience of coming of age Coming of Age With Deep Roots by Carrie Saxifrages | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/Coming+of+Age+with+Deep+Roots+final.mp3 Michelle Robinson lives on the Klahoose First Nation Reserve in Squirrel Cove, Cortes Island. Until she was nine, she grew up in the bush on Klahoose First Nation’s traditional territory of Toba Inlet where her parents hunted, fished and prepared their children to come of age in traditional ways. Many years later, when Michelle’s daughter reached a crisis, Michelle drew upon her culture and traditions to help daughter recover. “It wasn’t just your a teenager: you are changing life now; you’re out on your own; you are a big person. It started when you were little, nurtured up and then celebrated when it happened. Then you take your place in the community where you are meant to be.” - Michelle Robinson. Carrie Saxifrage has lived on Cortes Island since 1994. She has worked as a nurse, lawyer and school administrator and served on numerous community boards. Most recently she wrote a climate memoir titled The Big Swim - Coming Ashore in a World Adrift. The chapter Falling into Place describes how an ancient First Nation jawbone found on...