The Merry McKentys Return – On Tour

The Merry McKentys Return – On Tour

Originally Published on Cortes Currents According to the description on their website, the McKentys saga starts sounds on a steep snowy mountainside in the backwoods of British Columbia. Robert and Elizabeth had a small cabin, “many children of various sizes, a wood stove, a small battery-powered stereo system that sometimes worked, a mandolin, and several fiddles.” By the time they moved to Cortes, the Merry McKenty were on their way towards becoming a band. There were five people sitting around the table of their Vancouver home, the morning we skyped. It is easy to identify the rich timbre of Robert’s voice, or his daughter Ieva, but I find it more difficult to discern which of the boys –  Francis, Immanuel or Isa – is talking.  Coming Back To Cortes “We lived in a number of different places on Cortes because it is very difficult to find year round rentals, especially for a large family. Cortes is … a very unusual demographic, all told, and it is also a very unusual place to be in nature. Those two things stand out for all of us. … Whether we were living on the boat, or living in a campground in Smelt Bay, or when we lived in Smelt Bay for nearly ten years in a rental, every morning we could get out and we were in unusually pristine natural environment and go swimming, or go running … or go to the Co-op, especially when the Cafe is open.” – Robert  “We arrived in 2002 and didn’t find a summer rental and so moved off the island and then came back in 2003...
Coming To Cortes & Quadra: Pato Banon

Coming To Cortes & Quadra: Pato Banon

Originally Published on Cortes Currents Coming to Cortes & Quadra: Pato Banton & the Now Generation. In a special fundraiser for the new Cortes Garden Club, they will be performing at Mansons Hall on June 10 and Cortes Elementary Junior Secondary School June 11. Their last performance, before returning to the United States, is at the Heriot Bay Inn on June 12. A Local Connection: The band has a local connection. Pato’s wife, Antionette Rootsdawtah, visited Quadra and Cortes Islands during an international women’s conference.  I had hoped to interview Pato, his wife, or their local friend Lucretia, but this has not happened. As a result, the podcast below is almost all music – which actually fits with my original vision for this section. Notes Gleaned From The Net (Not mentioned in the podcast above) “Patrick Murray was born in London in 1961, and moved to Birmingham when he was 8 years old. Pato’s stepfather (Lester Daley) was a DJ fresh from Jamaica and the house in which they lived became the weekend night spot for the local community. Pato was the lookout for these illegal parties, working on the door from the age of 9. In his early teens Pato started to gain his musical foundation on his stepfathers’ sound system called V-Rocket, from helping set up the equipment at first to later selecting the music and trying his skills on the microphone.  Patrick would stay up all night entertaining the masses and was given the name Patoo by his stepfather. (The name derives from a wise night owl in Jamaica, that stays up all night, calling “patoo, patoo.”)”...
Review: These Are My Words

Review: These Are My Words

As an immigrant to Canada, I was shocked to learn about the Canadian legacy of residential schools. I had no idea growing up in the U.S. that such things were happened and had happened just north of the border. The indigenous residential schools operated in Canada starting in the 1870s with the last one not closing until1996. Children as young as four were taken—often against the will of their families or with coercive techniques such as threatening jail time—and it is estimated that over 150,000 Indian, Inuit, and Métis children attended residential school. I was reminded that it is a  legacy that continues to shade aspects of Canadian culture and identity for all Canadians this year when I became a citizen. At the ceremony, the judge encouraged all of us new Canadians to make the act of reconciliation personal and spoke about how she was doing that in her life.  Can We Understand? How does one take on such an enormous task of try to make better—or even understand—a system like residential school? It feels like an enormous task but one as an immigrant and as a mother that I want to take seriously. “Too many Canadians know little or nothing about the deep historical roots of these conflicts. This lack of knowledge has serious consequences for First Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples and for Canada,” counsels the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in their Final Report.  History is important because it allows us as a people to look at the dark aspects of our history to make our way toward a lighter future. But where to begin? One of the ways...
From Port Nevill To Cape Scott

From Port Nevill To Cape Scott

Originally Published on Cortes Currents In this morning’s program we conclude Jeanette Taylor’s presentation 60 Terrific Historical Spots to Visit on Northern Vancouver Island by looking at sites between Port Neville & Cape Scott. “When I started going [to Port Neville] about ten years ago it was still operating as a post office. Even though there is not more than ten people in the whole region, they hung on for dear life to their post office. They still had the original cancellation stamp from the 1890s there. So I had a stamp collector on one of the tours that I do there who was .. just shaking with excitement about writing a letter, putting a stamp on it and having it cancelled in the Port Neville Post Office.” – Jeanette Taylor From Port Neville To Cape Scott On Cortes Currents about 9 AM Wed, May 22, repeats 5 PM May 28 How Hans Hansen lost his hand and rowed from Vancouver to Port NevilleThree generations of the Hansen family at Port Neville The early Danish settlers at Cape ScottAfter three generations, one of Sontula’s residents still has a Finish accentWhy did the Hudsons Bay Company come to Fort Rupert?The petroglyphs and village at Fort RupertWhat’s the story behind Village Island? Where is New Vancouver?What its like to resettle an abandoned village site.Early settlers and villagers at Kingcome InletMarianne Nicholson’s cliff painting and other exhibitionsJudith William’s Book: “Two Wolves at the Dawn of Time: Kingcome Inlet Pictographs, 1893-1998”The 3,751 year-old tree at Watson’’s LakeBilly Proctor’s Museum at Echo BayNikki van Schyndel’s book: Becoming Wild: Living the Primitive Life on a West Coast Island Billy Proctor “has charisma and young women love him. He was raised by his...
Jeanette Taylor Part 2: Discovery Islands & More

Jeanette Taylor Part 2: Discovery Islands & More

Little girls in the tub, Schnarrs from Bute Inlet. courtesy Campbell River Museum Originally published on Cortes Currents.  In this morning’s Cortes Currents, we continue with the audio from Jeanette Taylor’s recent talk at Manson’s Hall. In the previous episode she talked about Old Quadra Island. Now we explore the rest of the Discovery Islands & more. “I just love that reef off the south tip of Marina Island. It is like another planet or something walking around on that reef at low tide. … It is really hard to photograph, but you can see it sneaking out far over to this side and then edging back in. That is a really long reef and I won’t tell you the full story but there is a wonderful aboriginal myth about the dog children which was collected in the 1880s and tells the story of how that reef and the one off south Cortes was formed.” – Jeanette Taylor In The Podcast Whaletown on Cortes Island: The Old The old church at Whaletown & Why should you visit Mittlenatch Island?Gorge Harbour’s petroglyphs When did the Spanish and English come to Teakerne Arm on West Redonda? (See also: How Did Toba Inlet Get It’s Name? )Who were the Moses & Martin Lucey buried on West Redonda in 1892?The Chilcotin War of 1864August Schnarr, his daughters and Bute InletWho were the first Europeans to visit Nootka Sound? Petroglyphs at Gorge Harbour, Cortes Island – courtesy Jeanette Taylor Alfred Waddington’s Dream “In the early 1860s, during the Gold Rush in BC, the engineer in Victoria named Waddington was looking for a new route to get in there that was less arduous...
Interviewing Sue Hall

Interviewing Sue Hall

originally published on Cortes Currents This week’s guest at Folk University’s Folk U Friday series was Sue Hall author of Fish Don’t Climb Trees, head of the Whole Dyslexic Society, and Davis Dyslexia facilitator. Sue Hall is also dyslexic and the mother of a dyslexic child and has taught a positive-based approached to working with dyslexia for 20 years. She talked about how to fid the gift in so-called learning disabilities and work with dyslexia in a positive way. Please listen to the CKTZ podcast for a brief interview with Sue Hall or visit https://thegreenmama.com/learning-differences/ to read more about dyslexia and learning differences.  What is a Learning Difference? One of the technical prerequisites of a learning disorder diagnosis is the possession of at least an average (and often above average) IQ, along with difficulties in processing spoken or written language or symbols. Thus, by definition, someone with a diagnosed learning disorder is “smart,” yet they may struggle with reading or writing or doing basic math. This is very different from an intellectual disability, signifying a cognitive capacity that is below average.  There can be learning differences that occur for a variety of reasons, though not all are considered learning disorders. Learning differences we typically hear about include dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). While all of these can affect a person’s learning, the medical and educational communities do not consider ADHD and ASD learning disorders.  So what is considered a learning disorder? Dyslexia, dysgraphia, and dyscalculia are common examples of learning disorders according to the medical and educational communities:  Dyslexia is the broadest of these “dys-es”, and affects the way a person relates...