Jeanette Taylor Part 2: Discovery Islands & More

Jeanette Taylor Part 2: Discovery Islands & More

Little girls in the tub, Schnarrs from Bute Inlet. courtesy Campbell River Museum Originally published on Cortes Currents.  In this morning’s Cortes Currents, we continue with the audio from Jeanette Taylor’s recent talk at Manson’s Hall. In the previous episode she talked about Old Quadra Island. Now we explore the rest of the Discovery Islands & more. “I just love that reef off the south tip of Marina Island. It is like another planet or something walking around on that reef at low tide. … It is really hard to photograph, but you can see it sneaking out far over to this side and then edging back in. That is a really long reef and I won’t tell you the full story but there is a wonderful aboriginal myth about the dog children which was collected in the 1880s and tells the story of how that reef and the one off south Cortes was formed.” – Jeanette Taylor In The Podcast Whaletown on Cortes Island: The Old The old church at Whaletown & Why should you visit Mittlenatch Island?Gorge Harbour’s petroglyphs When did the Spanish and English come to Teakerne Arm on West Redonda? (See also: How Did Toba Inlet Get It’s Name? )Who were the Moses & Martin Lucey buried on West Redonda in 1892?The Chilcotin War of 1864August Schnarr, his daughters and Bute InletWho were the first Europeans to visit Nootka Sound? Petroglyphs at Gorge Harbour, Cortes Island – courtesy Jeanette Taylor Alfred Waddington’s Dream “In the early 1860s, during the Gold Rush in BC, the engineer in Victoria named Waddington was looking for a new route to get in there that was less arduous...
Interviewing Sue Hall

Interviewing Sue Hall

originally published on Cortes Currents This week’s guest at Folk University’s Folk U Friday series was Sue Hall author of Fish Don’t Climb Trees, head of the Whole Dyslexic Society, and Davis Dyslexia facilitator. Sue Hall is also dyslexic and the mother of a dyslexic child and has taught a positive-based approached to working with dyslexia for 20 years. She talked about how to fid the gift in so-called learning disabilities and work with dyslexia in a positive way. Please listen to the CKTZ podcast for a brief interview with Sue Hall or visit https://thegreenmama.com/learning-differences/ to read more about dyslexia and learning differences.  What is a Learning Difference? One of the technical prerequisites of a learning disorder diagnosis is the possession of at least an average (and often above average) IQ, along with difficulties in processing spoken or written language or symbols. Thus, by definition, someone with a diagnosed learning disorder is “smart,” yet they may struggle with reading or writing or doing basic math. This is very different from an intellectual disability, signifying a cognitive capacity that is below average.  There can be learning differences that occur for a variety of reasons, though not all are considered learning disorders. Learning differences we typically hear about include dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). While all of these can affect a person’s learning, the medical and educational communities do not consider ADHD and ASD learning disorders.  So what is considered a learning disorder? Dyslexia, dysgraphia, and dyscalculia are common examples of learning disorders according to the medical and educational communities:  Dyslexia is the broadest of these “dys-es”, and affects the way a person relates...
Tales From Quadra Island’s Past

Tales From Quadra Island’s Past

Originally published on Cortes Currents Local historian Jeanette Taylor came to Mansons Hall, on Cortes Island, on April 26, 2019. The Cortes Island Museum invited her to present her slideshow “60 Terrific Historical Spots To Visit On Northern Vancouver Island”. I’ve taken some liberties in adapting Ms Taylor’s talk into a series of radio programs. The first one is tales from Quadra Island’s Past. Old Quadra Island “I’ve tried to have the general publics lens on and just chose stories you would especially enjoy knowing about. What I’m focusing on is not necessarily natural history, although it sneaks in there every once and awhile – because how can it not in a place like this – I’m mostly looking at human history sites where there are still remnants of people and their lives.” – Jeanette Taylor  Helen & Hosea Armenius Bull, owners of the Heriot Bay Inn, Quadra Island – courtesy Jeanette Taylor In The Podcast: Why is the Campbell River Museum interested in heritage sites throughout Northern Vancouver Island?Why is Haig-Brown House important to Campbell River?What is the writer in residence program?Why are the shell middens at Kanish Bay so important? How many 11,000 to 12,000 year old village sites are there on Quadra Island? What is the connection between the Lucky Jim Mine and logging?How did 37 people survive when the Grappler sank off Ripple Rock, in 1882?What role did miners and a Vancouver engineering firm have in the destruction of Ripple Rock?Where was the first village site Captain Vancouver saw when he arrived off Quadra Island in 1792?Why should you view the petroglyphs at Cape Mudge before 10 AM on a day the tide is out?How did the 400-year-old palisaded site...
Cougar Companions

Cougar Companions

Zaida & August Schnarr with their daughters Pansy and (baby) Pearl – courtesy Judith Williams Originally Published on Cortes Currents Judith Williams new book, Cougar Companions: Bute Inlet Country and the Legendary Schnarrs is the twenty-fourth issue of Raincoast Chronicles. She traces the Schnarr’s family story through a combination of diaries, interviews and rare photographs.  August Schnarr brought a Kodak camera when he came to this area, around 1910. “Without the photographs, I would just be telling a story about August, his daughters, the cougars and their neighbours. But I am looking at all the pictures of those people and First Nations sites, the back landscape. He is really the only person carrying a camera that far up. “ “He got this kodak 3 camera very early on. It still exists in beautiful condition. He was also able to get film, I think by union steamships but maybe other places, and send the stuff out to be developed by Woodwards and Spensers or whatever.” “It turns out he has quite a good eye for composition. So a lot of the photographs I focused on .. have fairly dynamic lines … and I think they are very interesting things to look at.” “A lot of people just try to record their lives, but he is trying to show us something about his life and the wilderness and I think those are his strongest photographs- Judith Williams. In The Podcast: Rowing from Washington state to Northeastern Vancouver Island.August Schnarr: logger, trapper, wilderness guide, inventorHow he met Zaida and their move to Bute Inlet.How their three daughters (Pansy, Pearl & Marion) became companions, and...
Greg Osoba On Music & Radio

Greg Osoba On Music & Radio

Originally Published on the ECOreport (Now Cortes Currents) He helped shape Cortes Radio almost since the beginning. as one of the station’s early Presidents, as a senior producer of our Deep Roots Initiative and most Fridays he hosts the Lunchtime Locomotion. In addition to this, he is a member of Cortes Island’s original rock quartet and more recently Back Eddy and the Procrastinators. In this morning’s interview, I asked Greg Osaba to tell us his story. In the podcast, Greg Osaba talks about … The radio station at Seneca College, in Ontario His eight years as a broadcast journalist in Toronto, Edmonton & Vancouver: in the newsroom and as host of “Bookshelf” Interviewing Guy Dauncey; Premier Peter Lougheed; Joe Clark; Wayne Gretsky … Asking tough questions of politicians vs interviewing a grieving family Ska, the precursor of Reggae How prerecording takes the soul out of music Gordy & Zoe Ryan from Babatunde Olatunji’s Drums of Passion; Island Rythm; Six Foot Johnson; Back Eddy and the Procrastinators When Gregor Robertson lived on Cortes Island, his first campaign (as an NDP MLA) The art of creating space, in music and life Falling in love with Cortes Island Linnaea Farm, Hollyhock, Rex Weyler as a mentor in writing, Getting involved with Cortes Radio, The Friday Lunchtime Locomotion with Nat king Cono “There is something to that adage 10 years of 10,000 hours, because something starts to happen after that point. Once you put in your time, what starts to happen I’ve found - and other musicians I know who are experienced concur with this - is that you become competent  …. suddenly...
Andy Vine

Andy Vine

Originally published on the ECOreport His best known song is probably Woman of Labrador, released in 2005. His musical roots go back to the UK’s 1960s folk revival. CKTZ listeners know him as the host of the Folk Club, every Wednesday at 10:00 AM. I recently interviewed Andy Vine about folk music, his trip to Ireland and much more. Andy Vine’s Pilgrimage Andy was born in Swansea, in the south of Wales, but spent most of his formative years in a suburb of Liverpool. His decades long connection with Ireland began with music. By 1963, Andy was in a folk group. They “decided to do a little pilgrimage to Ireland to find out more about the music they were singing.” “I just loved the culture and the people. They were so friendly and they love music so much. So when I went back to England I told my brother all about this and he was looking for a place to study for his masters degree in marine zoölogy … So he looked up Galway University, where they had a program he interested in, and got accepted at Galway University. While he was there he met his future wife,” says Andy. He added, “They live in her home town, … Clifden, which is where I [just] went and where the art’s festival [he performed in] was. So many years later that connection that I first started through my love of folk music … still lives on.” Steele’s Tavern On Yonge Street Steele’s Tavern on Yonge Street – Photographer: Harvey Naylor ca. 1975 City of Toronto Archives Fonds 1526, File 3, Item 26 via Flickr (CC BY SA, 2.0...