Canada’s New Green Deal Comes To Cortes

Canada’s New Green Deal Comes To Cortes

Originally published on Cortes Currents The idea was born in the United States. Canada’s Green new deal launched in Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal earlier this month. According to a poll of 2,000 Canadians conducted by Abacus Data, as much as 61% of the nation supports the idea of moving to 100% Green energy. There is much more of course. Town hall meetings are being held across the nation. At 6 PM on on June 14, Canada’s New Green Deal comes to Cortes Island. “I want to preface all of this by saying I’m not an expert. I’m just someone who cares passionately about the future and what we are leaving for our children. I do not know what is enough, or the particulars of what scientists are asking for, but I do know that we need to completely shift our economy in a way that is in line with what scientists are calling for. We need to include scientists in our discussions and I think Governments need to include scientists in making policy and stop including oil and gas lobbyists,” says Ashley Zarbatany, organizer of the June 14 Town hall meeting at Mansons Hall. In The Podcast Above: How long do we have left before the climate crises threatens human existence. What does Canada’s New Green Deal have to do with Canada’s 2019 election? Stop subsidizing the fossil fuel industry. Any subsidies should be given to the renewable sector.46% of Canadians are within $200 of insolvency. What can we do about the high cost of real estate and living? How FDR’s New Deal defeated the Facist movement in the...
Coming To Cortes & Quadra: Pato Banon

Coming To Cortes & Quadra: Pato Banon

Originally Published on Cortes Currents Coming to Cortes & Quadra: Pato Banton & the Now Generation. In a special fundraiser for the new Cortes Garden Club, they will be performing at Mansons Hall on June 10 and Cortes Elementary Junior Secondary School June 11. Their last performance, before returning to the United States, is at the Heriot Bay Inn on June 12. A Local Connection: The band has a local connection. Pato’s wife, Antionette Rootsdawtah, visited Quadra and Cortes Islands during an international women’s conference.  I had hoped to interview Pato, his wife, or their local friend Lucretia, but this has not happened. As a result, the podcast below is almost all music – which actually fits with my original vision for this section. Notes Gleaned From The Net (Not mentioned in the podcast above) “Patrick Murray was born in London in 1961, and moved to Birmingham when he was 8 years old. Pato’s stepfather (Lester Daley) was a DJ fresh from Jamaica and the house in which they lived became the weekend night spot for the local community. Pato was the lookout for these illegal parties, working on the door from the age of 9. In his early teens Pato started to gain his musical foundation on his stepfathers’ sound system called V-Rocket, from helping set up the equipment at first to later selecting the music and trying his skills on the microphone.  Patrick would stay up all night entertaining the masses and was given the name Patoo by his stepfather. (The name derives from a wise night owl in Jamaica, that stays up all night, calling “patoo, patoo.”)”...

Witnessing Reconcialtion In Action

This is a Cortes Radio update about witnessing reconciliation in action taken from the introduction that Carrie Saxifrage, President of the Cortes Community Forest Cooperative, gave to a meeting at Mansons Hall on May 22, 2019. “For starters, I would like to acknowledge that we are acknowledge that we are on the unceded territory of the Klahoose, the Sliammon and the Homalco and I went to the Awaken the Canoes event at Klahoose. I was really struck by the openness and generosity that I experienced, of somebody who is non indigenous. I was fed; I was taught how to paddle; how to pull a canoe. It was really amazing to me.” “It puts me in mind of the community forest and how I don’t think that we, without the Klahoose, would have a community forest. I think that they, without us, would have a community forest. The fact that it is shared is one of those acts of generosity and openness that I would like to acknowledge.” “This is reconciliation in action and this is another big word that I do not know exactly what it means but it does mean what they demonstrated to me so directly over the week-end, which is openness and generosity.” (Added by email) “I wish I’d concluded my intro by suggesting that we would do well by being as open and generous as the Klahoose as I don’t think reconciliation (openness and generosity) is really in their court, it’s our responsibility.” Photo Credits: Friends and relatives sending the Tl’emtl’ems off from the inner area at Squirrel Cove at the start of the 2018 Power Paddle to Puyallup– Roy L Hales...
Jonas & Amy: The Misty Isles New Owners

Jonas & Amy: The Misty Isles New Owners

Originally Published on Cortes Currents Many of you are probably aware that Cortes Island’s best known schooner has changed hands. After twenty-one years of showing tourists around our area, Mike Moore and Samantha Statton are retiring. I recently met with the Misty Isles new owners, Amy Bockner and Jonas Fineman, outside the Co-op in Mansons Landing.  Who Are They? “My early childhood [was spent] on the water – on a float house that my parents dragged off the land .. I think we spent four years living off that in Gorge Harbour … I loved it. We would row out to our house … Going fishing with my dad for our diner and all that stuff . My earliest memories were all there …” – Amy Bockner “I grew up on the Central Oregon Coast, literally right on the Pacific Ocean … I wasn’t really good at football or wrestling, which is what you had to be to be good at anything growing up on that part of the coast, but the ocean gave me a safe haven and and a lot of lessons that were mine and really beneficial. It became my solace mostly manifested through surfing, swimming and gradually propelling me towards earning a living on the water.” – Jonas Fineman In The Podcast Above:  What is Amy Bockner’s connection to Cortes Island?Why did Jonas Fineman become first a fisherman and then captain of a tourist vessel? What does Amy bring to the partnership?How did they become owners of the schooner? When will Jonas come home to be the Misty Isles captain?What are Jonas and Amy’s plans for the future? The 2019...
Review: These Are My Words

Review: These Are My Words

As an immigrant to Canada, I was shocked to learn about the Canadian legacy of residential schools. I had no idea growing up in the U.S. that such things were happened and had happened just north of the border. The indigenous residential schools operated in Canada starting in the 1870s with the last one not closing until1996. Children as young as four were taken—often against the will of their families or with coercive techniques such as threatening jail time—and it is estimated that over 150,000 Indian, Inuit, and Métis children attended residential school. I was reminded that it is a  legacy that continues to shade aspects of Canadian culture and identity for all Canadians this year when I became a citizen. At the ceremony, the judge encouraged all of us new Canadians to make the act of reconciliation personal and spoke about how she was doing that in her life.  Can We Understand? How does one take on such an enormous task of try to make better—or even understand—a system like residential school? It feels like an enormous task but one as an immigrant and as a mother that I want to take seriously. “Too many Canadians know little or nothing about the deep historical roots of these conflicts. This lack of knowledge has serious consequences for First Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples and for Canada,” counsels the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in their Final Report.  History is important because it allows us as a people to look at the dark aspects of our history to make our way toward a lighter future. But where to begin? One of the ways...
From Port Nevill To Cape Scott

From Port Nevill To Cape Scott

Originally Published on Cortes Currents In this morning’s program we conclude Jeanette Taylor’s presentation 60 Terrific Historical Spots to Visit on Northern Vancouver Island by looking at sites between Port Neville & Cape Scott. “When I started going [to Port Neville] about ten years ago it was still operating as a post office. Even though there is not more than ten people in the whole region, they hung on for dear life to their post office. They still had the original cancellation stamp from the 1890s there. So I had a stamp collector on one of the tours that I do there who was .. just shaking with excitement about writing a letter, putting a stamp on it and having it cancelled in the Port Neville Post Office.” – Jeanette Taylor From Port Neville To Cape Scott On Cortes Currents about 9 AM Wed, May 22, repeats 5 PM May 28 How Hans Hansen lost his hand and rowed from Vancouver to Port NevilleThree generations of the Hansen family at Port Neville The early Danish settlers at Cape ScottAfter three generations, one of Sontula’s residents still has a Finish accentWhy did the Hudsons Bay Company come to Fort Rupert?The petroglyphs and village at Fort RupertWhat’s the story behind Village Island? Where is New Vancouver?What its like to resettle an abandoned village site.Early settlers and villagers at Kingcome InletMarianne Nicholson’s cliff painting and other exhibitionsJudith William’s Book: “Two Wolves at the Dawn of Time: Kingcome Inlet Pictographs, 1893-1998”The 3,751 year-old tree at Watson’’s LakeBilly Proctor’s Museum at Echo BayNikki van Schyndel’s book: Becoming Wild: Living the Primitive Life on a West Coast Island Billy Proctor “has charisma and young women love him. He was raised by his...