2016: WHAT THE MISTY ISLES OFFERS

2016: WHAT THE MISTY ISLES OFFERS

[From the Archives: April 26, 2016] A thriving ecotourism sector has grown up in the twenty years since logging ruled over British Columbia’s economy. One of the foremost voices in the Discovery Island area is Mike Moore, whose sailboat the Misty Isles has been touring these waters since 1997. This is the first program taken from a long conversation about ecotourism and what the Misty Isles offers ecotourists. What The Misty Isles Offer A significant portion of this lunch originates from the Moore’s garden on Cortes Island. “This is very special for people who are passionate about the environment, but live in the city. It is a dream for most people to know exactly where their food comes from and exactly what season you are in. In the fall we are out cutting next years firewood and putting the garden to bed. In the spring, everything is starting up,” says Mike Moore. “We delve into the history, the natural history and the future of this area. We will talk about early pioneers and First Nations, but we will also talk about what we see on site in terms of forestry practises, fish farms and other things that effect the area.” The narrative follows the growth of his vision from the his teenage years in Victoria to what he and his wife Samantha are presently experiencing in and around Cortes Island. The Rich Ecological Diversity Plunging into water whose temperatures reach 26 C during the summer. He describes the rich ecological diversity of a region which hosts the warmest waters north of Mexico. “When you dive into Pendrell Sound at the end of July, you enter...
MAWHINNEY RUNNING FOR REGIONAL DIRECTOR IN AREA C

MAWHINNEY RUNNING FOR REGIONAL DIRECTOR IN AREA C

Quadra Island designer, print maker, graphic artist and ‘rural community enthusiast’ Robyn Mawhinney will be running for Regional Director in Electoral Area C (Discovery Islands and Mainland Islets) on October 15, 2022. The incumbent Jim Abram, who has been a director since 1988, recently announced he will not seek another term. Mawhinney explained, “I have been speaking with a lot of neighbours and community members, and I have heard that it is time for generational change. I am deeply committed to this area, the community and the land. And I want our community and Area C to continue being led by islanders, with island values.” Image credit: Map of Area C – courtesy SRD website She was born in Black Creek and moved to Quadra Island 28 years ago. Mawhinney raised her children on Quadra, built a farm, and has worked on a variety of professional and passion projects. She served on the boards of several local organizations. Mawhinney was a founding team member of the Quadra Island Fall Fair and also served on the board of the Quadra Island Children’s Centre. “I call myself a rural community enthusiast because I really appreciate the community that we have and the energy that it has. There’s lots of ways to be engaged,” said Mawhinney. “I am currently on the trails committee, which is great because I also call myself a lover of the wilds. I do really love forests and outdoors, and I find soul medicine in the forest and I love building trails. Making them even better or creating trails for folks to have opportunities to access the wild which can increase people’s understanding and love of those...
2017: WHAT THE 50 SUMMERS OF LOVE SAYS TO THIS GENERATION

2017: WHAT THE 50 SUMMERS OF LOVE SAYS TO THIS GENERATION

[From the Archives: Aug 15, 2017] As many as 100,000 people participated in the 1967 Summer of Love. There were 450 at the recent anniversary celebration on Cortes, which is a huge turn-out for our little island.  I was there, asking what the 50 Summers of Love says to this generation. What the 50 Summers Of Love Says To This Generation Looking through the portraits on Be-in Wall at Linaea Farm at Cortes Island – Courtesy Richard Truman from http://www.richardtrueman.com/ As you can hear in the attached podcast, I wandered through the crowd asking people about their experience. One participated in the original Summer of Love in San Francisco’s Haight Ashbury neighbourhood. Another was at the 1967 Be-in in Vancouver’s Stanley Park. Two were not yet born, but never-the-less look upon it as a time of “love, caring and interest in social concerns.” One of my respondents felt that the message of hope so integral to the sixties has been almost completely forgotten. Another added that little has changed over the intervening decades. More described the sixties and seventies as a life changing experience that has lasted to this day. We Need To Carry The Spark One of the performers Courtesy Richard Trueman from http://www.richardtrueman.com/ Here are a few quotes from the podcast: “I was just finishing school and trying to decide whether to go to Woodstock, or go to work …” “John Lennon told us that the sixties was just the beginning. It was a spark and we need to carry the spark, so that is what I have been trying to do.” “It’s about caring about whats around you,...
LEARNING ABOUT OLD GROWTH ON THE RAINFOREST TRAIL

LEARNING ABOUT OLD GROWTH ON THE RAINFOREST TRAIL

The Rainforest Trail, near Tofino, is much more than a simple path through the woods. Massive western red cedars and western hemlocks tower over visitors as they follow the twisting boardwalks through an enchanted landscape full of the ferns, lichen and fungi typical of an old growth ecosystem. The oldest inhabitant of this stand is a red cedar that was reputedly a sapling when Marco Polo set off for the Orient in 1271. This means it is about 950 years old today. A series of information plaques transform the +2 kilometre hike into an educational experience. Image credit: Standing beside the ‘Ancient Monarch,’ a 950-year-old red cedar on the Rainforest Trail – courtesy Roy L Hales One of them explains how BC’s  rainforest came into being. Giant conifers spread across the landscape 15 million years ago, during a time of global cooling. Prior to that, they were largely restricted to alpine environments. However the landscape was changing. Clouds of volcanic ash blocked out the sun.  The rise of coastal mountains changed local weather patterns. Summers were cooler and wet, winters were mild. Looking up the trunk of the ‘Ancient Monarch’ – Photo by Roy L Hales Another describes the rich soil, which plays host to the rainforest today: “The soil — a world of perpetual night where miniature life forms roam a maze of roots, soil particles, and rotting wood. The surface layer, a thick mat of decaying plant and animal matter, is the food bank of the rainforest community. But it doesn’t release its wealth easily. Material rots slowly in this acidic soil and heavy rains carry nutrients deep...
MARK VONESCH 6: HOUSING, THE NUMBER ONE ISSUE IN THIS ELECTION

MARK VONESCH 6: HOUSING, THE NUMBER ONE ISSUE IN THIS ELECTION

The Electoral Areas Housing Needs Report identified an immediate demand for 75 rental and 40 retail units on Cortes Island. In a previous interview, Mark Vonesch from the Cortes Community Housing Society, said, “I hear stories of people having to quit their jobs because they can’t find housing for the summer. I know people that are living under a tarp. I know seniors that are living in a tent.” However a quick scan of the real estate pages turns up  three homes, for between $890,000 and $2.7 million, and it will probably be at least a year before Cortes Island’s affordable housing development will be ready. When Rainbow Ridge finally does accept tenants, it will meet a little more than a quarter of the current rental need. In the last of a series of articles about his running for Regional Director, Vonesch talks about affordable housing. “The number one issue that I hear from people across the political spectrum is housing. It’s affecting every business on this island. I think we all know somebody who’s struggling with housing, who’s losing their housing, who has unstable housing. The fact that this is something that everyone’s concerned about gives me hope that we can come together and find solutions around it,” he explained. “I’ve spent the last six or eight months working with the Cortes Housing Society, helping develop and distribute a Regional Housing Survey that has provided a lot of information and statistics that I think are going to help us take action on the issue. Give us a better understanding of the problem and see our ability to find the common ground...
SACHIKA: THE THINGS I CHERISH

SACHIKA: THE THINGS I CHERISH

(From the Archives: Aug 26, 2019) Her first performance was as a little girl at Linnaea School on Cortes Island. She was 21, when she produced her first CD. Since then, she has become one of the area’s better known artists. She is living on Mayne Island now, but her mother, Naomi Hayter, still lives on Cortes Island. That is where Sachika Kosky talked about, “the things I cherish.” An Absolutely Magical Place To Grow Up “I didn’t know that I was creating somebody who wanted to be a pop star, but I gave her this little plastic Fischer-Price microphone when she was a little toddler. She’d be away in the forest singing away to the trees and the birds.” – Naomi Hayter. “My father and my mother are musical. My mom has an incredible singing voice and my dad used to play harmonica on the porch, as my brother and I would fall asleep in our little cabin in the woods.”  It was an absolutely magical place to grow up. The island is full of music. There is the bird songs, the ocean and the wind in the trees; community holding hands and singing together. We had many parties and events chanting, singing together, dancing in circles. I feel very blessed to have had the upbringing I did.”  – Sachika Kosky.   Love Fest 2017 (l to r) with Holly Arnsen, Leonard Woywitka, Rex Weyler, Rick Bockner, Shivon Robinsong, Sachika Kosky, and Lisa Gibbons Songs in the Podcast “I’ll Be There” “Spiritual Song” “Brilliant Blue” “Heartbeat” “Not Gunna Play” “Fade” Sachika & Naomi sing “Like A Ship In The Harbour” “What Am I To...