Coming To Cortes & Quadra: Pato Banon

Coming To Cortes & Quadra: Pato Banon

Originally Published on Cortes Currents Coming to Cortes & Quadra: Pato Banton & the Now Generation. In a special fundraiser for the new Cortes Garden Club, they will be performing at Mansons Hall on June 10 and Cortes Elementary Junior Secondary School June 11. Their last performance, before returning to the United States, is at the Heriot Bay Inn on June 12. A Local Connection: The band has a local connection. Pato’s wife, Antionette Rootsdawtah, visited Quadra and Cortes Islands during an international women’s conference.  I had hoped to interview Pato, his wife, or their local friend Lucretia, but this has not happened. As a result, the podcast below is almost all music – which actually fits with my original vision for this section. Notes Gleaned From The Net (Not mentioned in the podcast above) “Patrick Murray was born in London in 1961, and moved to Birmingham when he was 8 years old. Pato’s stepfather (Lester Daley) was a DJ fresh from Jamaica and the house in which they lived became the weekend night spot for the local community. Pato was the lookout for these illegal parties, working on the door from the age of 9. In his early teens Pato started to gain his musical foundation on his stepfathers’ sound system called V-Rocket, from helping set up the equipment at first to later selecting the music and trying his skills on the microphone.  Patrick would stay up all night entertaining the masses and was given the name Patoo by his stepfather. (The name derives from a wise night owl in Jamaica, that stays up all night, calling “patoo, patoo.”)”...
From Port Nevill To Cape Scott

From Port Nevill To Cape Scott

Originally Published on Cortes Currents In this morning’s program we conclude Jeanette Taylor’s presentation 60 Terrific Historical Spots to Visit on Northern Vancouver Island by looking at sites between Port Neville & Cape Scott. “When I started going [to Port Neville] about ten years ago it was still operating as a post office. Even though there is not more than ten people in the whole region, they hung on for dear life to their post office. They still had the original cancellation stamp from the 1890s there. So I had a stamp collector on one of the tours that I do there who was .. just shaking with excitement about writing a letter, putting a stamp on it and having it cancelled in the Port Neville Post Office.” – Jeanette Taylor From Port Neville To Cape Scott On Cortes Currents about 9 AM Wed, May 22, repeats 5 PM May 28 How Hans Hansen lost his hand and rowed from Vancouver to Port NevilleThree generations of the Hansen family at Port Neville The early Danish settlers at Cape ScottAfter three generations, one of Sontula’s residents still has a Finish accentWhy did the Hudsons Bay Company come to Fort Rupert?The petroglyphs and village at Fort RupertWhat’s the story behind Village Island? Where is New Vancouver?What its like to resettle an abandoned village site.Early settlers and villagers at Kingcome InletMarianne Nicholson’s cliff painting and other exhibitionsJudith William’s Book: “Two Wolves at the Dawn of Time: Kingcome Inlet Pictographs, 1893-1998”The 3,751 year-old tree at Watson’’s LakeBilly Proctor’s Museum at Echo BayNikki van Schyndel’s book: Becoming Wild: Living the Primitive Life on a West Coast Island Billy Proctor “has charisma and young women love him. He was raised by his...
Jeanette Taylor Part 2: Discovery Islands & More

Jeanette Taylor Part 2: Discovery Islands & More

Little girls in the tub, Schnarrs from Bute Inlet. courtesy Campbell River Museum Originally published on Cortes Currents.  In this morning’s Cortes Currents, we continue with the audio from Jeanette Taylor’s recent talk at Manson’s Hall. In the previous episode she talked about Old Quadra Island. Now we explore the rest of the Discovery Islands & more. “I just love that reef off the south tip of Marina Island. It is like another planet or something walking around on that reef at low tide. … It is really hard to photograph, but you can see it sneaking out far over to this side and then edging back in. That is a really long reef and I won’t tell you the full story but there is a wonderful aboriginal myth about the dog children which was collected in the 1880s and tells the story of how that reef and the one off south Cortes was formed.” – Jeanette Taylor In The Podcast Whaletown on Cortes Island: The Old The old church at Whaletown & Why should you visit Mittlenatch Island?Gorge Harbour’s petroglyphs When did the Spanish and English come to Teakerne Arm on West Redonda? (See also: How Did Toba Inlet Get It’s Name? )Who were the Moses & Martin Lucey buried on West Redonda in 1892?The Chilcotin War of 1864August Schnarr, his daughters and Bute InletWho were the first Europeans to visit Nootka Sound? Petroglyphs at Gorge Harbour, Cortes Island – courtesy Jeanette Taylor Alfred Waddington’s Dream “In the early 1860s, during the Gold Rush in BC, the engineer in Victoria named Waddington was looking for a new route to get in there that was less arduous...
Tales From Quadra Island’s Past

Tales From Quadra Island’s Past

Originally published on Cortes Currents Local historian Jeanette Taylor came to Mansons Hall, on Cortes Island, on April 26, 2019. The Cortes Island Museum invited her to present her slideshow “60 Terrific Historical Spots To Visit On Northern Vancouver Island”. I’ve taken some liberties in adapting Ms Taylor’s talk into a series of radio programs. The first one is tales from Quadra Island’s Past. Old Quadra Island “I’ve tried to have the general publics lens on and just chose stories you would especially enjoy knowing about. What I’m focusing on is not necessarily natural history, although it sneaks in there every once and awhile – because how can it not in a place like this – I’m mostly looking at human history sites where there are still remnants of people and their lives.” – Jeanette Taylor  Helen & Hosea Armenius Bull, owners of the Heriot Bay Inn, Quadra Island – courtesy Jeanette Taylor In The Podcast: Why is the Campbell River Museum interested in heritage sites throughout Northern Vancouver Island?Why is Haig-Brown House important to Campbell River?What is the writer in residence program?Why are the shell middens at Kanish Bay so important? How many 11,000 to 12,000 year old village sites are there on Quadra Island? What is the connection between the Lucky Jim Mine and logging?How did 37 people survive when the Grappler sank off Ripple Rock, in 1882?What role did miners and a Vancouver engineering firm have in the destruction of Ripple Rock?Where was the first village site Captain Vancouver saw when he arrived off Quadra Island in 1792?Why should you view the petroglyphs at Cape Mudge before 10 AM on a day the tide is out?How did the 400-year-old palisaded site...
Cougar Companions

Cougar Companions

Zaida & August Schnarr with their daughters Pansy and (baby) Pearl – courtesy Judith Williams Originally Published on Cortes Currents Judith Williams new book, Cougar Companions: Bute Inlet Country and the Legendary Schnarrs is the twenty-fourth issue of Raincoast Chronicles. She traces the Schnarr’s family story through a combination of diaries, interviews and rare photographs.  August Schnarr brought a Kodak camera when he came to this area, around 1910. “Without the photographs, I would just be telling a story about August, his daughters, the cougars and their neighbours. But I am looking at all the pictures of those people and First Nations sites, the back landscape. He is really the only person carrying a camera that far up. “ “He got this kodak 3 camera very early on. It still exists in beautiful condition. He was also able to get film, I think by union steamships but maybe other places, and send the stuff out to be developed by Woodwards and Spensers or whatever.” “It turns out he has quite a good eye for composition. So a lot of the photographs I focused on .. have fairly dynamic lines … and I think they are very interesting things to look at.” “A lot of people just try to record their lives, but he is trying to show us something about his life and the wilderness and I think those are his strongest photographs- Judith Williams. In The Podcast: Rowing from Washington state to Northeastern Vancouver Island.August Schnarr: logger, trapper, wilderness guide, inventorHow he met Zaida and their move to Bute Inlet.How their three daughters (Pansy, Pearl & Marion) became companions, and...
Andy Vine

Andy Vine

Originally published on the ECOreport His best known song is probably Woman of Labrador, released in 2005. His musical roots go back to the UK’s 1960s folk revival. CKTZ listeners know him as the host of the Folk Club, every Wednesday at 10:00 AM. I recently interviewed Andy Vine about folk music, his trip to Ireland and much more. Andy Vine’s Pilgrimage Andy was born in Swansea, in the south of Wales, but spent most of his formative years in a suburb of Liverpool. His decades long connection with Ireland began with music. By 1963, Andy was in a folk group. They “decided to do a little pilgrimage to Ireland to find out more about the music they were singing.” “I just loved the culture and the people. They were so friendly and they love music so much. So when I went back to England I told my brother all about this and he was looking for a place to study for his masters degree in marine zoölogy … So he looked up Galway University, where they had a program he interested in, and got accepted at Galway University. While he was there he met his future wife,” says Andy. He added, “They live in her home town, … Clifden, which is where I [just] went and where the art’s festival [he performed in] was. So many years later that connection that I first started through my love of folk music … still lives on.” Steele’s Tavern On Yonge Street Steele’s Tavern on Yonge Street – Photographer: Harvey Naylor ca. 1975 City of Toronto Archives Fonds 1526, File 3, Item 26 via Flickr (CC BY SA, 2.0...