Behind Every Good Man Are Strong Women

Behind Every Good Man Are Strong Women

In this episode Deep Roots producer Takes us on a journey through one woman’s determination to reclaim a piece of her culture, through a coming of age ceremony and her son’s journey to claiming his identity. Behind Every Good Man Are Strong Women by Jacqueline Mathieu | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/08+Behind+Every+Good+Man+Are+Strong+Women+mp3+master.mp3 “It about a 30 minute ride on the motorboat from Lund BC, at the tip of the Sunshine coast, to Squirrel Cove, on Cortes Island. As long as I can remember, we travelled that route to get back home. Home to my mom’s community of Klahoose. As children we would pile up in the little speedboat of my mom’s friend Andy, who would take us to Squirrel Cove for a fee of $25 and a six pack of pilsener. Andy would untie his boat at the dock and we would slowly pull out of Lund, passing the corner of Sevilla Island- we were off.” – Jacqueline Mathieu I would like to dedicate this story to my nephews Gary and Darrian Hachez who carried on the tradition of this beautiful ceremony when they became of age. Jacqueline Mathieu, of Klahoose First Nation. Her dedication to community, strength and calmness of communication is inspiring. Jacqueline works for her community as the Brighter futures youth worker, Salish Language Tech, and as Deep Roots Klahoose Coordinator: bringing Klahoose stories and voices to CKTZ 89.5 fm Cortes Community radio.    ...
The Trail

The Trail

Toba Inlet is a remote fjord roughly 180 kilometres north of Vancouver. It is geographically closer to Campbell River, though the trip is an hour and 45 minutes by water taxi. A recently discovered arborglyph, believed to be a trail marker, suggests this area was not so isolated in pre-colonial days. Deep Roots story producer Roy L Hales interviews Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse, from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian Judith Williams about the trail from pre-contact Toba Inlet to the rest of British Columbia. The Trail by Roy L Hales | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/The+Trails+mp3+Master.mp3 “When I went up to the site to take a picture of the tree as I was looking around trying to see if there was a trail between the two markers, I had noticed an indentation in the ground. In my inexperience I assumed that whoever carved the face could have had a lean to or shanty and lived in that indentation … It would be interesting to see a team go up there and  maybe discover the trail, or discover that indentation in the ground; to do an archaeological dig or survey.”  - Ken Hanuse, Klahoose First Nation There was this web of trails, throughout the whole west coast. If this in fact marks a trail, it would indicate one of the webs of the trail. And these trails went from tidewater, from Toba, all of the inlets, certainly in Bute and Knight Inlet. These trails went inland . often with trade materials. They are called grease trails, but they traded more than that. These arborglyphs and other marking...
Preserve/ Preserve/ Reserve

Preserve/ Preserve/ Reserve

  “It’s a mouth-watering touring through time in this piece as I explore how the preservation of food and culture are connected on and off the Reserve. Pull up a chair, all are welcome at the table as we learn about smoking salmon, stringing herring, and why all important events start with sharing a meal.” - Manda Aufochs Gillespie   Preserve/Preserve/Reserve by Manda Aufochs Gillespie | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/06+Preserve+Preserve+Reserve+mp3+Master.mp3 It’s that time of year at Kookpa’s house!
Today’s phrase of the day is 
ɬaɬganačɛnsəm ta ɬagət hoy šɛmatč.
tlatl’gah’na’chensum ta tla’gut hoy sheh’mat’ch
I will thread the herring and then dry it. The elder in this recording is Dave Dominick Please click on this link to listen https://fv.nuxeocloud.com/…/No…/Sliammon/learn/phrases/50885 - ~from Koosen Pielle, language preservationist. I’d like to thank Yvonne Louie, Koosen Pielle, Tiffany Jamieson, Sally Fallon Morrell, Morgan Tams, Odette Auger, and Jacqueline Mathieu for help creating this story through the gifts of their time, stories, passion, and clam chowder.  Manda Aufochs-Gillespie is a health writer, author of the Green Mama series of books (Dundurn), and publisher of the award-winning website thegreenmama.com, Manda LOVES writing about, talking about and, of course, eating food! It’s been a dream getting to write for radio, meet and interview some of my heroes, and explore deeper my Cortes home while putting together this piece for Cortes radio. Thanks to each and everyone who took the time to share a bit of their story in shaping this story....
To Womanhood

To Womanhood

When a girl approaches puberty, her culture’s attitudes toward women and sex come at her in new and often intense ways, both by what is said and also by what is left unsaid. Elder Helen Nora Hansen was raised in a residential school that treated coming of age with the silence of shame. Michelle Robinson’s parents raised her in the bush in Klahoose traditional territory and gave her the traditional teachings about coming of age. From their dramatically different experiences, these woman have great advice on how to support our girls as they make their way toward adulthood. To Womanhood by Carrie Saxifrage | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/To+Womanhood+mp3+Master.mp3 “It wasn’t a good experience. That was back in 1960, when I was in residential school, so not a good experience at all.” - Elder Helen Nora Hansen, Klahoose First Nation. “It was a celebrated time. Before they would have parties, which people called potlatches, coming of age ceremonies or whatever. There were things that were done to celebrate that and that young lady was kept a treasure … and taken care of.” - Michelle Robinson, Social Development Officer and Band Councillor, Klahoose First Nation. Carrie Saxifrage has lived on Cortes Island since 1994. She has worked as a nurse, lawyer and school administrator and served on numerous community boards. Most recently she wrote a climate memoir titled The Big Swim - Coming Ashore in a World Adrift. The chapter Falling into Place describes how an ancient First Nation jawbone found on her family’s land helped her understand how we share places through time. http://www.saxifrages.org/carrie/ Photos: (top) Elder Helen Nora Hansen;...
Awakening The Canoes

Awakening The Canoes

What was the role of the canoe in pre-contact indigenous culture? What caused its decline? And how are canoe journeys finding their way back to Klahoose and her sister nations? In this episode, producer Roy Hales outlines the awakening of the canoes. Awaken The Canoes Roy L Hales/ Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/Awakening+the+Canoes+mp3+Master.mp3 “The significance of the canoe was undeniable. Almost every person, or every second person had access to a canoe. We know so little about the canoe culture when you consider that in the totality of First Nations, how important it was. It carried us to food; it carried our relations from community to community; it made economics possible…” - Jodi Simkin, Director, Cultural Affairs and Heritage, Klahoose First Nation. In 1884: “The Canadian Government decided they were going to keep us restricted to reserves and we had to ask permission to leave. If I wanted to visit my grandmother, I wait for the Indian Agent to come and I’d say, ‘I want to travel to Ladysmith to visit my grandmother.’ I had to get a pass to leave the community.” – Michelle Robinson, Social Development Manager and councillor, Klahoose Nation The awakening started in 1989, with what has become an annual event for First Nations along the West Coast from Alaska to California. This summer the Klahoose take part in their second tribal journey: the Power Paddle to Puyallup . Washington, where they join in a celebration (July 28 – August 4, 2018) consisting of singing, dancing, stories and sharing food. Roy L Hales is the President of the Cortes Radio Society (CKTZ 89.5 FM), where he has hosted a half hour program since 2014,...
‘Princess J’

‘Princess J’

Jacqueline Mathieu’s journey to uncover her indigenous roots began in the most unexpected of places - an animated movie. Driven by an obsession with the main character, an interest in her own heritage blossomed over the course of her young life, as her journey to understand her culture began to stretch into the lives of her mother, her family, her community and beyond. In this episode of Deep Roots Island Waves, Jacqueline tells producer Morgan Rhys Tams the story of a young woman’s quest to uncover, reclaim and ultimately celebrate her indigenous heritage, reclaiming her identity from mass media, personal demons and Canada’s shameful past. 'Princess J' by Morgan Rhys Tams | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/Princess+Jacqueline+mp3+Master.mp3 “When I was a kid, I was really into Pochahontas. I really loved the love story; I loved how she was like communicating with animals. She is tall and slender. Her hair was long, past her butt and perfectly shaped at the end. And when the wind would blow, her hair would blow all the same direction. I just thought she was the epitome of perfection. Sometime in the movie I remember looking at my babysitter and I told her ‘I wish I was Pochahontas; I wish I was an Indian.’ And she looked at me and she said, ‘You are.an Indian.'” – Jacqueline Mathieu Morgan Rhys Tams is a multi-disciplinary artist and media educator who spends his time on an assortment of small islands on British Columbia’s West Coast. As an artist his work has been shown in galleries, festivals and broadcast internationally. As an educator he has taught in partnership with The National...