Cultivating Traditional Health

Cultivating Traditional Health

Recent research and long held traditions around health and food have challenged conventional practices of making available and promoting high carbohydrate, sugary, processed foods for convenience and economy. Some studies now conclude that animal fats have more to do with maintaining good health than eating the previously recommended low fat diet. Traditional Indigenous diets clearly show how eating from one’s own environment suits our overall well being and health. The experiences of our ancestors also has been shown to inform our own genetics, affecting our present day to day life. In this episode of Deep Roots Island Waves, Producer Manda Aufochs Gillespie links place, food, genetic history and health for insight into possibilities for understanding how we’re much more than we eat.” Culturing Traditional Health by Manda Aufochs Gillespie | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/specialproduction/14+Cultivating+Traditional+Health+mp3+master.mp3 Traditional Health & Epigenetics “This story of salmon boy is a fantastical creation myth and it is a story of how essential animals were to one indigenous community. Or how the health of a people in intricately connected to the health of their food source. This connection is behind one of today’s newest science buzzwords, epigenetics. “Epigenectics is the study of how the expression of our genes can be turned up or down by environmental factors. We are learning that things we once considered hardwired, such as our tendency towards obesity, heart disease and even schizophrenia can be influenced by our grandparent’s diets or something like our great grandparent’s exposure to certain chemicals, or even experiences such as something that may have happened to our ancestors like one winter spent very hungry or extremely...
Language Warrior

Language Warrior

Language Warrior is a story about Jessie Louie, and her life’s work preserving and revitalizing ʔayʔaǰuθəm a distinct dialect of Northern Salishan. Jessie knows the value of reclaiming language as a source of strength; a treasure to preserve, and a key to survival. There is only one fully fluent speaker left who speaks this at Klahoose, and less than a dozen fully fluent speakers in total left on our planet. This is why the name Language Warrior truly is fitting. Language Warrior by Odette Auger | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/13+Language+Warrior+mp3+Master.mp3 The good news.. Linguists say even endangered languages can revive, if people have a choice, and an opportunity to learn. Jessie shares her story on how residential school attempted to stifle her language, and how she lived a life working to hand her language down to younger generations… “there is hope… I know it will carry on through these young people who put their heart and soul into it”. Odette Auger, Sagamok Anishnabek: The past 5 years have been focused on fundraising and project management, youth programming. With Deep Roots and Island Waves, I have thoroughly enjoyed the collaborative process, and am excited to have facilitated new and ancient talent, skills, specialists and voices to our community. The opportunity to also write and produce in this series is an...
Toba: The Heart Home

Toba: The Heart Home

Toba Inlet is the glacier blue artery punching into the heart of the Toba River Valley and its mountainous flanks to access the mainland body of Klahoose traditional territory. Toba: The Heart Home by Rochelle Baker | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/12+Toba+the+Hearthome+mp3+Master.mp3 An entity in and of itself, Toba resources were, and continue to be, vital to Klahoose survival, culture and economic well-being. The notion place can have affect on those that reside there is ancient and widespread in human history. The Toba has shaped and has been shaped by the Klahoose, and the settlers, homesteaders and loggers who followed. The story of Toba: The Heart Home is how living in his people’s traditional territory profoundly shaped a young boy. And, how that experience built a foundation of resilience, and forged an inspirational bond with an ancestor, both of which he’d draw upon to surmount challenges later in life.  Rochelle Baker, reformed newspaper reporter and former urban princess, recently moved to the Discovery Islands to try and recapture the enchantment of her childhood summers on Cortes Island. The sound of the radio was a permanent feature in her home growing up, and remains so today. Working with the Deep Roots collective and learning from the Klahoose Nation was a step in fulfilling a long-time dream of sharing the magic of stories over the airwaves and as a window into people’s lives....
Stand Your Ground

Stand Your Ground

Stand Your Ground is a story about Jessie Louie, first woman chief of Klahoose who found herself elected Chief in 1970; a time when women in leadership roles were few. The electoral system was brought by the Canadian government, upon nations who with hereditary chiefs. The electoral system was meant to bring equality and prevent oppression. If this has happened, it is only through the strength, determination and honour of leaders like Jessie Louie. Stand Your Ground by Odette Auger | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/specialproduction/10+Stand+Your+Ground+mp3+Master.mp3 Jessie was the chief who brought water to Klahoose… a perfect metaphor for a woman who is a source of strength and support for her loved ones. That water still flows, and like all Jessie’s work, ripples outward with lasting effects. “When elections came, back in the 70s, the community was only two rows of houses. My cousin Elinor Pielle had suggested I run for chief and low and behold I won by one vote. I was just speechless. I’m twenty-three years old and I’m a chief! I said, ‘Oh my God, where do I go from here? - because I had no idea how, or where, or anything of the affairs - because there is no band office; no nothing. I don’t think I even had a phone.” - Jessie Louie. “Be humble and respect your people” is Jessie’s advice to leaders, and she quietly leads the way in all her work. Jessie’s life is a legacy of promoting Indigenous women’s rights in communities, inspiring healthy paths as drug and alcohol counsellor, and preserving culture for the future as language coordinator. E’mote Jessie Louie,...
The Klahoose Arborglyph

The Klahoose Arborglyph

British Columbia is known for its totem poles. Examples of a less known artwork have surfaced in more recent years. Aborglyphs are carved into living trees. One was discovered a few years ago, two hundred kilometres north of Vancouver in the midst of a clearcut in Toba Inlet. The Klahoose Arborglyh has been moved to the band’s multipurpose building in Squirrel Cove, Cortes Island. Deep Roots story producer Roy L Hales interviewed Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse, from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian Judith Williams about the arborglyph that survived into modern times. The Klahoose Arborglyph by Roy L Hales | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/specialproduction/11+The+Klahoose+Arbourglyph+mp3+Master.mp3 The Klahoose arborglyph is believed to have been a marker on the pre-contact trail between Toba Inlet and the Upper Squamish Valley. Why Is The Arborglyph Important? “Its a reminder of who we are and our connection to the land. So there are many many markers that would have been out there, but … [the land] has been logged. So this is one that survived and it is here now. “For Klahoose people it is really important. There is pieces … [of our past] that our kids need to know about because there has been so much lost already. So if it wasn’t there and it wasn’t brought here, it could have been taken down by another logging company. There are still cruel people out there that would just go up there and take it down because they don’t want us to be connected to the land.” - Michelle Robinson, Social Development Officer and Band Councillor, Klahoose First Nation Roy L...
Reclaiming Culture, Culture Nights

Reclaiming Culture, Culture Nights

Reclaiming Culture is a look into Culture nights with Michelle Robinson. What is shared over a meal? More than food, teachings are passed along through generations. Gathering to celebrate identity inspires drum making, and new songs are sung. Songs were lost as a direct result of intentional oppression [eg. residential school]. When Klahoose writes new songs to Welcome people to their lands, we are witnessing a profound moment of living culture, of cutting edge language work and a powerful pivot point in history. We also hear the voice of Jessie Louie, Drew Blaney drumming and song workshop, Cortes Museum and Archives work recording school children learning a new public song. Hands up to Jessie Louie, Michelle Robinson, CIMAS’s Brittany Baxter and Drew Blaney. Reclaiming Culture, Culture Nights by Odette Auger | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/09+Reclaiming+Culture%2C+Culture+Nights+final+mp3+master.mp3 “We want it back. We know what’s been taken away from us by the government, the church, through residential schools and all those things. You know, you keep hearing that we want that, we want our culture, Lets do it. Everybody was on board and we’ve had a great turn-out, knowing that people wanted it. … AT the beginning everyone was unsure, how are we going to do this song? It was kind of neat just to walk through the fears of everybody and they just sat there and all of a sudden they were part of it. You see it growing and waken it up in them, as I like to say.” - Michelle Robinson,  Social Development Manager and councillor, Klahoose Nation. Note on the songs used in this story: Drew Blaney shares...