Introduction to Forest Therapy


Introduction to Forest Therapy


In this addition of the Folk U Talk Show, Sobhana Dilani Hippola, certified forest therapy guide, joins host Manda Aufochs Gillespie to discuss forest therapy and its many benefits. This was part of the Nature is Good For You series on CKTZ done in partnership with Friends of Cortes Island (FOCI), Folk University, and the Cortes radio partners Cortes Currents and Cortes Community Radio. (Should you get so inspired……In these times of physical distancing, Sobhana has also offered us an adapted guided forest therapy walk recording which you can download here https://www.friendsofcortes.org/Cortes-Nature-MP3/GuidedForestTherapyWalk.mp3 or visit https://www.friendsofcortes.org/education/nature-is-good-for-you-on-cktz/) and take with you to practice on your own in a forest near you. The recorded walk takes approximately 2 hours to complete. Before you head out on the walk, please listen to the first few minutes of the recording where Sobhana lists some practical matters and things you’ll need to bring with you on the walk. If you’re wearing earphones, please make sure to have one ear in for the recording and one ear out so you can hear the sounds of nature around you!    Folk U What is Forest Therapy? Forest therapy, otherwise known as “forest bathing” or “Shinrin-Yoku”, is a Japanese-inspired healing practice of bathing in the atmosphere of the forest to receive its medicinal and therapeutic benefits. It is unlike a traditional hike where we may have a certain destination or fitness goal, or a naturalist walk where we are learning all the names and attributes of the plants and creatures that we come across. A forest therapy walk is an intentionally slow, quiet, meditative, sensory-based experience where we...

Nature Is Good For Us

Most of us intuitive understand that being in nature is good for us. On Friday May 22 Helen Hall joined Manda Aufochs Gillespie on Folk University’s Friday Folk U Talk Show on CKTZ 89.5 FM to explain just how true this is according to the research.  Folk U Frida: Manda AUfochs Gillespie interview Helen Hall From FOCI Being In Nature Is Good For US “Most of us sense that being in nature is good for us, says Helen, taking a break from the rush of our daily lives, enjoying the beauty and peace of being in a natural setting. Now, research is showing that being in nature has real, quantifiable health benefits both mental and physical. Even 5 minutes around trees or in a natural space may improve health she says. Think of it as a prescription with no negative side affects and it’s also free. Exposure to forests, trees and nature can: Boosts the immune systemLower blood pressureReduces stressImproves moodIncreases the ability to focus, even in children with ADHDAccelerates recovery from surgery or illnessIncreases energy levelImproves sleep A peek into Helen’s Notebook: How do we know Nature is Good for us? WHAT IS Biophilia and BIOPHILIC DESIGN? Biophilia (meaning love of nature) focuses on human’s innate attraction to nature and natural processes. It suggests that we all have a genetic connection to the natural world built up through hundreds of thousands of years of living in agrarian settings. It is a term popularized by American biologist Edward O Wilson in the 1980’s, when he observed how increasing rates of urbanisation were leading to a disconnection with the natural world. With...
Cortes Island’s Species at Risk

Cortes Island’s Species at Risk

On the May 15th Folk U Friday, Manda Aufochs Gillespie Interviewed Autumn Willow a citizen scientist with Friends of Cortes Island (Foci), about Cortes Island’s species at risk. Autumn gave us a lot of information on 10 of the species, many more are featured on the friendsofcortes.org website, visit them here  Some of the species at risk that Autumn featured:Great Blue Heron. Learn more here . Listen to their sound. Pacific Coastal Cutthroat Trout. Learn more here. Silver Spotted Skipper. Learn more here.Townsend’s Big-eared Bat. Learn more here. Western Toad. Learn more here. Barn swallow. Learn more  here  Listen to their sound. Sooty Grouse. Learn more here. Northern Pygmy Owl. Learn more here.  Sam Mayer did the gardening section and talked about lasagna gardening as a way of making soil while growing.  Top photo credit: Northern Pygmy Owl - Glaucudium gnoma swarthi - Nick Saunders,...
Folk U Friday: Herbal Medicine 101

Folk U Friday: Herbal Medicine 101

Herbal medicine 101 - keeping it simple: how to make herbal medicine in your own kitchen with locally abundant and common plants Yulia Kochubievsky, herbalist and founder of Made by Yulia (madebyyulia.ca) joined Manda Aufochs Gillespie for this week’s Folk U Talk Show. She was every bit as inspiring as she hoped to be and primarily discussed how even the shy and reluctant could begin to work with herbs.  Folk U Friday: Manda Aufochs Gillespie interviews Yulia Kochubievsky You don’t need to know or have lots of herbs to use herbs successfully for health says Yulia. Rather, she advises getting familiar with the uses of a few plants that are readily available around you. Most herbs have multiple healing functions and thus a person can have a healthy apothecary at their fingertips by just learning a few herbs. Many people worry about starting with making their own plant medicine for fear of getting it wrong, not knowing what is poisonous or what the different plants do. Yulia described this as being very similar to how she used to feel about plants. She encouraged want-to-be Folk Herbalists, to remember that all that is easily available on the computer and internet and not to let it stand in the way of getting started.  Yulia likes making her own tinctures, balms, honey or whatever from fresh plant material that she has gathered herself. Homemade is always her first choice for medicine. Second, she chooses making her own medicine from purchased herbs. And third buying already made medicines.  Yulia discussed some readily abundant plants found easily in and around Cortes, Quadra, and much...
Folk U Friday: Early Birds

Folk U Friday: Early Birds

This is a fabulous time of year to hear the dawn chorus and begin to listen for bird calls as birds are establishing territories or trying to attract a mate. The result is an amazing orchestra of bird song, right on your doorstep every morning. It’s free and all you have to do is roll out of bed a little early, sit back and listen! It’s a wonderful way to start the day! Folk U Friday: Manda Aufochs Gillespie interviews Helen Hall, Corry Dow & George Sirk We’re delighted to be hosting our very own Dawn Chorus and numerous other Cortes bird songs on CKTZ with local twitcher Corry Dow. Join us to hear Cortes birds and listen while Corry describes who to listen out for and how to tell your towhees from your flickers.   Helen Hall, from FOCI, introduced the Nature is Good for You Series and talks about ways to stay engaged with nature on Cortes right now and Jane from the Cortes Island Museum and Archives discusses the May 2nd Bird Count and how to put your new twitcher skills to use! As well, neighbour and Nature Boy, George Sirk called to discuss migratory birds and who is here right now and who to expect in the next couple of months, including our shortest visitor the NightHawk. Nature Is Good For You – on CKTZ! Feeling stressed, worried or just fed up with the gloomy news?  It may feel intuitive, but being in nature is good for you. FOCI, Folk U, and CKTZ have joined forces to create our very own ‘Nature is Good for...
The Marine Environment Around Cortes Island

The Marine Environment Around Cortes Island

Mike Moore obviously has an intense passion for the ocean and for the waters around Cortes Island in particular. He has been working on the water or under it for more than 40 years, as a commercial halibut, crab and prawn fisherman, as a diver harvesting sea cucumbers, sea urchins, scallops and the giant pacific octopus, as a Navigation Officer with the Canadian Coast Guard for 11 years and finally, along with Samantha Statton, he was owner/ operator of Misty Isles Adventures, Cortes Island’s kayaking and passenger schooner tourism business, which was the vessel by which many tourists and locals got to appreciate Cortes as an island, seen from the water. Flok U Friday: Manda Aufochs Gillespie interviews Mike Moore The Setting “Cortes is situated in the most diverse and dynamic area on the BC coast” says Mike. “We have the warm waters of Desolation Sound to the east. I don’t know of another place in the world where one can swim in water that warm under snow on the mountains that is that low. And that is pretty neat. But because this is an isolated pocket of water, the sea life  that lives even as close as Campbell River might not live in Desolation Sound. In fact life in Desolation Sound is not very diverse with mostly mussels, oysters and barnacles dominating the intertidal cliff walls. But if you go deeper, say down to 20 meters below the surface, the water is frigid again and supports sea anemones, fish and boot sponges with their silicious skeletons.” Just to the north are the deep mainland fjords of Toba and...