Archaeology 102: Peoples of BC

Archaeology 102: Peoples of BC

In Archaeology 102: The Science of Once and Future Things BC edition professor and neighbour Dr. Brian Hayden, archaeologist, takes us through thousands of years of human history and what it can tell us about the peoples of BC.  Quiggly hole, or Si7xten, in Lillooet, 1996 by Skookum1 @ en.wikipedia (Public domain) Folk U Radio: Manda Aufochs Gillespie interviews Dr Brian Hayden about Archaeology 102 Archaeology, like all sciences, has those aspects of it which are certain, probable, and speculative Dr. Hayden tells us. Because archeology as a science has only been around for 150 years there are not a lot of certain things, such as that the first stone tools showed up 2 to 3 million years ago, that the first people came to North America 15 to 20,0000 years ago, and that both cultural and biological evolution of humans has occurred.  First people in BC These things are known. Recent findings in BC, such as the 14,000 year old artifacts at Triquet Island, now compose the oldest artifacts found in North America. The artifacts were found just 500 km northwest of Victoria and included tools for lighting fires, fish hooks, and spears. They seem to confirm what many archeologists have speculated: that humans first came into North America along the coast of BC 20,000 to 15,000 years ago. Geologically at this time, the ice-sheets were parting. These ice-sheets covered the area and were covered by 1 kilometre-deep ice. This ice melted about 10,000 years ago in this area. It is probable that these first peoples were simple hunter gatherers that lived with no competition, where little or nothing was owned,...
Archaeology 101

Archaeology 101

Folk U Radio: 101 Series. Archaeology: the science of once and future things and I am joined in the studio by our neighbour Dr. Brian Hayden, archeologist extraordinaire. Brian got his doctoral degree from the University of Toronto and taught  archaeology at Simon Fraser University for 40 years and is now a Research Associate at the University of British Columbia, fellow of the Royal Society of Canada: and, of course, a professor here at the esteemed Folk University.  His archeological and ethnoarchaeological research has taken him to Australia, Southeast Asia, France, Guatemala, Mexico, Ontario, and here to British Columbia.  Folk U: Manda Aufochs Gillespie interviews Dr Dr. Brian Haydon about Archaeology: the science of once and future things In Archaeology: The Science of Once and Future Things, Dr. Hayden discussed what archaeology is and what it isn’t and the important distinctions of context that separate it from antiquarianism. Archaeology as the study of trash and archeologists are able to decode this trash to understand the level of income inequality, education, and many other things about a culture.  Top photo credit: A dig in Villaricos (Murcia) by Capture the Uncapturable via Flickr (CC BY SA, 2.0...
Hayley Newell talks about the Brain

Hayley Newell talks about the Brain

On the September 1st, 2020 broadcast, Manda played a recording from back in the pre-COVID days when Folk U offered a series of weekly lectures at Linnaea Farm. The Brain 101 with Hayley Newell, RTC.  Folk U: Hayley Newell explains Brain 101 Your brain - the organ central to your nervous system - is a fascinating and complex machine. There are many MANY fascinating things to learn, far too many for one talk. So, in The Brain 101 we will start with learning the four key threats to the brain; what they are, how this relates to your day-to-day life and why it is useful to understand them. As well learn tips for self regulation to improve the function of your brain, even in when it’s a challenge.  Catch past talks with Hayley Newell including the Nervous System 101, The Brain on Play, and more...
Cortes Economics comes to Folk U

Cortes Economics comes to Folk U

On August 21st Manda welcomed Adam McKenty, head of the Cortes Community Economic Development Association (CCEDA) back to Folk U Radio to explain Cortes Economics 101. Folk U: Adam McKenty talks about Cortes Economics Cortes Economics 101 Understanding the Cortes Economy starts with understanding macro economics influences. Very quickly Adam McKenty takes us from macro economics to the very, very local situation of Cortes.  What’s a sustainable economy on Cortes look like?  This session will look at global trends and get local with Cortes statistics and results from CCEDA’s LEAP report. Don’t miss Adam McKenty discuss how to use your money to invest in Cortes using Community Investment Cooperatives.  Invest In Your Community: Using Your Money For The Benefit Of Cortes Folk University Folk University is the people’s university of Cortes Island. Where neighbours share their interests and passions with each other.  NOw it is also a radio program broadcast over Cortes Radio, CKTZ 89.5 FM, every FRiday from 1 to 3 PM and repeated Manda Aufochs Gillespie is a writer. She’s the author of the Green Mama series of books  (https://thegreenmama.com/books/) and the publisher of the award-winning website thegreenmama.com.  She is also a mother, neighbour, and founder of Folk University...
The Mysterious World Of An Octopus

The Mysterious World Of An Octopus

On the July 10th Folk U Friday: (1) Lucretia Shanfarber talked more about the Cortes Garden Club and things she’s learned about no dig gardening from gardens on Cortes and Quadra. (2) The main feature was Michael Moore explaining the mysterious underwater world of the octopus. Diver Michael Moore Folk U Fridays: Manda Aufochs Gillespie interviews Lucretia Shanfarber about the Cortes Garden Club and Michael Moore about the mysterious world of an octopus Imagine yourself in the distant past, as a coastal dweller, wading knee deep in the ocean’s tide pools on a summer’s low tide afternoon. Bending down, you peer through the water searching for abalone, sea urchins, sea cucumber or rockfish stranded by the ebbing tide to make your evening meal. Suddenly your leg is encircled by an arm and held by suction cups. You jerk away and feel that the grip is strong. But then it lets you go and the arm retreats, to disappear under a rock where you can just see the eye of the octopus peering out. For coastal peoples, the octopus was often personified as being evil. One of it’s monikers was the Devil Fish. It is a creature that has no fixed shape and it can change its colour and texture to hide away. It is covered with a clear viscous slime. Its eight arms are lined with hundreds of suction cups leading at the junction of the arms, to the beak that in some species like Australia’s blue ringed octopus, can deliver a lethal bite to humans. At sea, sailors in their fear inspired imaginations likely melded the octopus with its close cousin the giant...
Cortes Island Waste & Recycling

Cortes Island Waste & Recycling

There was music. Miyako Reid talked about her garden, chickens and other aspects of life on Cortes. Brian Pfeifle joins host Manda Aufochs Gillespie for feature presentation on the June 26th Folk U Friday: ‘Cortes Waste & Recycling Demystified.’ As people get more waste conscience, the people on Cortes Island can be proud to know that they have one of the most successful waste diversion programs in the region. And BC has created successful programs to deal with their waste, so that there are still markets for the recycling in BC despite unstable global systems. Folk U: Miyako Reid talks about gardening & Brian Pfeifle joins host Manda Aufochs Gillespie for ‘Cortes Waste & Recycling Demystified.’ Is Your Recycling Really Recycled?  Yes! Here’s where it goes and what it becomes: Hard Plastic Packaging: Goes to Metro Vancouver where it’s recycled into pellets that can be made into new productsMetal Containers: Goes to BC, Ontario, and the US where its recycled into new packaging and sheet metalPaper: Is marketed overseas, in the US, and in BC and made into products such as egg cartons, boxes, and other paper productsGlass: (Only collected at the depot) remains in BC to become new containers, sandblast materials, or construction aggregateFoam: (Only collected at the depot) and processed locally and overseas and is made into picture frames, crown mouldings, and other productsPlastic bags and overwrap: (Only collected at the depot) go to Metro Vancouver to be made into new packaging and products.Flexible and crinkly plastic packing: (Only collected at the depot) remains in BC as part of a research and development project to determine the...