Awakening The Canoes

Awakening The Canoes

[REPOST FROM JUNE 24, 2018] What was the role of the canoe in pre-contact indigenous culture? What caused its decline? And how are canoe journeys finding their way back to Klahoose and her sister nations? In this episode, producer Roy Hales outlines the awakening of the canoes. Awaken The Canoes Roy L Hales/ Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/Awakening+the+Canoes+mp3+Master.mp3 “The significance of the canoe was undeniable. Almost every person, or every second person had access to a canoe. We know so little about the canoe culture when you consider that in the totality of First Nations, how important it was. It carried us to food; it carried our relations from community to community; it made economics possible…” - Jodi Simkin, Director, Cultural Affairs and Heritage, Klahoose First Nation. In 1884: “The Canadian Government decided they were going to keep us restricted to reserves and we had to ask permission to leave. If I wanted to visit my grandmother, I wait for the Indian Agent to come and I’d say, ‘I want to travel to Ladysmith to visit my grandmother.’ I had to get a pass to leave the community.” – Michelle Robinson, Social Development Manager and councillor, Klahoose Nation The awakening started in 1989, with what has become an annual event for First Nations along the West Coast from Alaska to California. This summer the Klahoose take part in their second tribal journey: the Power Paddle to Puyallup . Washington, where they join in a celebration (July 28 – August 4, 2018) consisting of singing, dancing, stories and sharing food. Roy L Hales is a former President of the Cortes Radio Society (CKTZ 89.5 FM), where he...
How Did Toba Inlet Get Its Name?

How Did Toba Inlet Get Its Name?

[REPOST FROM JUNE 22, 2018] Toba is not an English word, or Coast Salish. The first Europeans to visit this remote fjord on the West Coast of British Columbia were Spanish. Deep Roots story producer Roy L Hales interviews Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse, from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian Judith Williams to ask How did Toba Inlet get its name? How Did Toba Inlet Get Its Name by Roy L Hales | Deep Roots Island Waves http://rest.s3for.me/deep-roots/How+Toba+Got+It%27s+Name+mp3+Master.mp3 On June 24, 1792, Captain Dionisio Alcalá Galiano made the following log entry for his schooner Sutil: “At sunset [Captain Cayetano] Valdés returned. He had followed the Canal de la Tabla and inspected the vicinity. [The inlet], which appeared [of] considerable [width] at its beginning, came to an end in a few leagues; its shores were very high, with sharp peaks, its depth great, and the inlets he saw were full of small islands. On its east shore Valdés found a plank [tabla], for which he named the inlet and of which he made a drawing. It was covered with paintings, which were apparently hieroglyphics of the natives. He found some abandoned villages, but not one inhabitant.”  How Did Tobla Inlet Get Its Name? Where is this mysterious tablet with hieroglyphic writing today? What did the writing say? Why is this important to the Klahoose Nation? If the Spanish gave Tobla Inlet its name, why does their log entry say “the Canal de la Tabla” rather than Tobla Inlet? Roy L Hales is a former President of the Cortes Radio Society (CKTZ 89.5 FM), where he has hosted a news radio program since 2014, and also...
The Klahoose Arborglyph

The Klahoose Arborglyph

British Columbia is known for its totem poles. Examples of a less known artwork have surfaced in more recent years. Aborglyphs are carved into living trees. One was discovered a few years ago, two hundred kilometres north of Vancouver in the midst of a clearcut in Toba Inlet. The Klahoose Arborglyh has been moved to the band’s multipurpose building in Squirrel Cove, Cortes Island. Deep Roots story producer Roy L Hales interviewed Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse, from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian Judith Williams about the arborglyph that survived into modern times. The Klahoose Arborglyph The Klahoose Arborglyph - Ken Hanuse photo The Klahoose Arborglyph by Roy L Hales, Deep Roots Island Waves The Klahoose arborglyph is believed to have been a marker on the pre-contact trail between Toba Inlet and the Upper Squamish Valley. Why Is The Arborglyph Important? “Its a reminder of who we are and our connection to the land. So there are many many markers that would have been out there, but … [the land] has been logged. So this is one that survived and it is here now. “For Klahoose people it is really important. There is pieces … [of our past] that our kids need to know about because there has been so much lost already. So if it wasn’t there and it wasn’t brought here, it could have been taken down by another logging company. There are still cruel people out there that would just go up there and take it down because they don’t want us to be connected to the land.” - Michelle Robinson, Social Development Officer and Band Councillor, Klahoose First Nation...
From The Muses Garden-1

From The Muses Garden-1

From The  Muse’s Garden with Dancing Wolf: Mondays 5 - 6 PM; Repeats Fridays 12 - 1 PM (SCROLL DOWN FOR PODCASTS) Long have I had a Dream of combining Poetry and Music into a radio show and now sure seems like the time. Please tune in early Monday evenings on Cortes Community Radio CKTZ 89.5 FM from 5:00 - 6:00 for From The Muse’s Garden. 1 hour of local and international readings dovetailing with reflective music to perhaps enjoy your supper to. JULY July 18, 2022 July 4, 2022 June 2022 June 27, 2022 June 20, 2022 June 13, 2022 June 6, 2022 MAY 2022 May 30, 2022 May 23, 2022 May 16, 2022 Mother’s Day Special May 8, 2022 Beltane 2022 April 2022 April 25, 2022 April 18 Trees, 2022 April 11, 2022 April 4, 2022 March 2022 March 28, 2022 March 21, Equinox Special, 2022 International Women’s Day Special March 8, 2022 Feb 2022 Feb 28, 2022 Anti War Feb 21, 2022 Feb 14, Love Special, 2022 Feb 7, 2022 Jan 2022 Tribute To Thich Nhat Hanh Jan 24, 2022 Jan 17, 2022 Jan 10, 2022 Jan 3, 2022 Dec 2021 Awake In Me Winter Dance Dec 27, 200th Show, All Poetry, 2021 Dec 20, Solstice 2021 Dec 6, 2021 NOV 2021 Nov 29, 2021 Robert Bly Nov 22, 2021 Nov 15, 2021 Nov 8, 2021 NOV 1, 2021 OCT 2021 Oct 18, 2021 Oct. 11, 2021 Oct 4, 2021 SEPT 2021 Sept 29, 2021 Sept 20, 2021 Sept. 13, 2021 Sept 6, 2021 AUGUST 2021 Aug 30, 2021 Aug 16, 2021 Aug 9 2021 Aug 2, 2021 JULY, 2021 July 19,...
Thursday Locomotion

Thursday Locomotion

Lunchtime Locomotion with Nat King Cono -Thursdays 11 AM - 1 PM; Repeats Tues 1 - 3 PM Nat King Cono brings you lively and thoughtful music from around the world to get your weekend started. Somewhat nostalgic and always toe tapping, he endeavours to get you moving. June 17, 2021 June 10, 2021 June 3, 2021 May 27, 2021 May 20, 2021 http://rest.s3for.me/lunchtimelocomotion/2021-05-13+Channel+1+11-00-00.mp3 May 13, 2021 http://rest.s3for.me/lunchtimelocomotion/2021-05-06+Channel+1+11-00-00.mp3 May 6, 2021 April 29, 2021 April 22, 2021 April 8, 2021 March 25th, 2021 March 18, 2021 March 11, 2021 February 25, 2021 February 18, 2021 Thursday January 28, 2021 Thursday January 21, 2021 Thursday, Nov 26, 2020 Thursday, Nov 19, 2020 Thursday, Nov 5, 2020 This can include live interviews with locals and visitors who are making a difference. From artists and authors to musicians and politicians, spontaneous discussions are always in the moment and never edited or prerecorded. Nat stays true to the spirit and essence of “live” radio unscripted. Thursday, Oct 1, 2020 - Lunchtime Locomtion Last Shows Until March  The talking Heads @ the El Mocambo, Toronto, Ontario, Canada- foto by paul b. toman via wikipedia (CC BY SA, 3.0 License)  Jan 11, 2019 - Friday Lunchtime Locomotion Dec 7, 2018 - Friday Lunchtime Locomotion October 2018 Oct 20 (Noba Anderson Interview) - Friday Lunchtime Locomotion Oct 13 (George Sirk Interview) - Friday Lunchtime Locomotion Greg Osaba (AKA Nat King Cono) of Friday Lunchtime Locomotion Fundamental to his love of radio is music. “As a musician and keen listener I’m always curious as to who’s doing what and finding a niche to fit into. Often that can mean playing...